Culture

CAA Supporters Tell Us What They Feel About The Act And Protests

While it is important to cover the protests and talk about the rallies, it would be more insightful to actually talk to those in support of the CAA.

While we see the huge, continuous protests against the new Citizenship Amendment Act, there has been a buzz of "Pro-CAA" rallies from around the nation. Most of these rallies have had poor participation, with only about a 100 people taking part.

While it is important to cover the protests and talk about the rallies, it would be more insightful to actually talk to those in support of the CAA, and ask them for their opinions. Here are some people we spoke to and what they think about the whole ordeal -

Why Do You Support The Act?

"Many people are pointing out how the act excludes people, but nobody is talking about how this is the first time in history that we are granting citizenship to people facing persecution. It's a huge deal. I think the act will benefit so many families and people who have been struggling in these other countries." Sheetal, 34.

"The point of the bill is to grant citizenship, not take it away. These liberals find a way to fit anything into their narrative of "divisive politics." There's nothing divisive about the act, Muslims cannot be minorities in a Muslim country. It's that simple, they are fine and even if they aren't they have other Muslim countries to fall back to. Why do these so-called minorities always ask for more than they have? Can't they just live with what they have?" Jayesh, 46.

"There's only one way to ensure that what happened in Kashmir to the Kashmiri Pandits never happens again. If we erase the root, there will be no problem, there's no other solution. Modi has always made sure he takes the Hindus, who are slowly turning into a minority, into consideration. He's the only leader keen on bringing this nation to its real cultural roots." Radhika, 32.

Why Do You Think People Are Protesting Against The Act?

"Where were these people when the Kashmiri Pandits were being beaten out of their homes? Where were the protests then? Nowhere, those Pandits quietly suffered. This is payback for those actions. Those who are protesting aren't protesting for any human rights, otherwise, they wouldn't be silent about the Pandit atrocities. These protesters are out there being Muslim apologists, it's brainwashing - which the Congress has managed to do very smartly." Sheetal, 34.

"These liberals are on the streets, burning buses and destroying public property, there's no way these are "desh-bhakts." They have no idea what it means to be loyal to your country, first of all, they are anti-Modi and hate everything he does. Even if the man does something right, how do you expect these people to appreciate anything he does? They won't. They love their Pappu (Rahul Gandhi) and Italian mother (Sonia Gandhi) and they are loyal only to them, not the nation." Jayesh, 46.

"If you ask even one person at the protest why they chose to come out, I'm sure no one will know why. It's a fashion statement now to be a part of these big protests and whatnot, that's why we see Deepika Padukone and Anurag Kashyap there - they want to be popular. Students want to miss classes, and they have no value for the people around them, the traffic protests cause is terrible, but why would they care about anybody else? Pseudo-secularists." Radhika, 32.

What Do You Think Of The Violence In Jamia, JNU, and AMU?

"See the police has a job, they're supposed to react when they're instigated. They're also human after all. Burning buses and expecting the Police to remain silent is just stupid. JNU students have been known for all the anti-national sloganeering and tukde tukde dialogues, the violence there was probably done by them as a way of framing the government who they clearly hate. As far as AMU is concerned, I don't know what happened there so I will not comment." Sheetal, 34.

"Nobody asked students to come on the streets, they did it knowing fully well what the consequences were. What more can be said? If you think you're being a "freedom fighter" then be ready to die, get beaten up and toughen up a little. You go there thinking you're so cool, and when actions are taken you complain. Don't be a hypocrite, either man up or let it be and study like you're supposed to." Jayesh, 46.

"How is it that every time it's some Muslim university on the face of controversy like this? There's a reason why. These universities are clearly affiliated with the communists, they are simply spreading their propaganda and then they cry when there are actions taken against them. There is no sense anymore. Under the name of democracy, there is rioting, anti-Hindu propaganda and anti-national slogans. What democracy allows this? None. There will be violence if you behave like this." Radhika, 32.

The Citizenship Amendment Act has been put into effect since the 10th of January amid country-wide protests and resistance.

Culture

CAA Supporters Tell Us What They Feel About The Act And Protests

While it is important to cover the protests and talk about the rallies, it would be more insightful to actually talk to those in support of the CAA.

While we see the huge, continuous protests against the new Citizenship Amendment Act, there has been a buzz of "Pro-CAA" rallies from around the nation. Most of these rallies have had poor participation, with only about a 100 people taking part.

While it is important to cover the protests and talk about the rallies, it would be more insightful to actually talk to those in support of the CAA, and ask them for their opinions. Here are some people we spoke to and what they think about the whole ordeal -

Why Do You Support The Act?

"Many people are pointing out how the act excludes people, but nobody is talking about how this is the first time in history that we are granting citizenship to people facing persecution. It's a huge deal. I think the act will benefit so many families and people who have been struggling in these other countries." Sheetal, 34.

"The point of the bill is to grant citizenship, not take it away. These liberals find a way to fit anything into their narrative of "divisive politics." There's nothing divisive about the act, Muslims cannot be minorities in a Muslim country. It's that simple, they are fine and even if they aren't they have other Muslim countries to fall back to. Why do these so-called minorities always ask for more than they have? Can't they just live with what they have?" Jayesh, 46.

"There's only one way to ensure that what happened in Kashmir to the Kashmiri Pandits never happens again. If we erase the root, there will be no problem, there's no other solution. Modi has always made sure he takes the Hindus, who are slowly turning into a minority, into consideration. He's the only leader keen on bringing this nation to its real cultural roots." Radhika, 32.

Why Do You Think People Are Protesting Against The Act?

"Where were these people when the Kashmiri Pandits were being beaten out of their homes? Where were the protests then? Nowhere, those Pandits quietly suffered. This is payback for those actions. Those who are protesting aren't protesting for any human rights, otherwise, they wouldn't be silent about the Pandit atrocities. These protesters are out there being Muslim apologists, it's brainwashing - which the Congress has managed to do very smartly." Sheetal, 34.

"These liberals are on the streets, burning buses and destroying public property, there's no way these are "desh-bhakts." They have no idea what it means to be loyal to your country, first of all, they are anti-Modi and hate everything he does. Even if the man does something right, how do you expect these people to appreciate anything he does? They won't. They love their Pappu (Rahul Gandhi) and Italian mother (Sonia Gandhi) and they are loyal only to them, not the nation." Jayesh, 46.

"If you ask even one person at the protest why they chose to come out, I'm sure no one will know why. It's a fashion statement now to be a part of these big protests and whatnot, that's why we see Deepika Padukone and Anurag Kashyap there - they want to be popular. Students want to miss classes, and they have no value for the people around them, the traffic protests cause is terrible, but why would they care about anybody else? Pseudo-secularists." Radhika, 32.

What Do You Think Of The Violence In Jamia, JNU, and AMU?

"See the police has a job, they're supposed to react when they're instigated. They're also human after all. Burning buses and expecting the Police to remain silent is just stupid. JNU students have been known for all the anti-national sloganeering and tukde tukde dialogues, the violence there was probably done by them as a way of framing the government who they clearly hate. As far as AMU is concerned, I don't know what happened there so I will not comment." Sheetal, 34.

"Nobody asked students to come on the streets, they did it knowing fully well what the consequences were. What more can be said? If you think you're being a "freedom fighter" then be ready to die, get beaten up and toughen up a little. You go there thinking you're so cool, and when actions are taken you complain. Don't be a hypocrite, either man up or let it be and study like you're supposed to." Jayesh, 46.

"How is it that every time it's some Muslim university on the face of controversy like this? There's a reason why. These universities are clearly affiliated with the communists, they are simply spreading their propaganda and then they cry when there are actions taken against them. There is no sense anymore. Under the name of democracy, there is rioting, anti-Hindu propaganda and anti-national slogans. What democracy allows this? None. There will be violence if you behave like this." Radhika, 32.

The Citizenship Amendment Act has been put into effect since the 10th of January amid country-wide protests and resistance.

Culture

CAA Supporters Tell Us What They Feel About The Act And Protests

While it is important to cover the protests and talk about the rallies, it would be more insightful to actually talk to those in support of the CAA.

While we see the huge, continuous protests against the new Citizenship Amendment Act, there has been a buzz of "Pro-CAA" rallies from around the nation. Most of these rallies have had poor participation, with only about a 100 people taking part.

While it is important to cover the protests and talk about the rallies, it would be more insightful to actually talk to those in support of the CAA, and ask them for their opinions. Here are some people we spoke to and what they think about the whole ordeal -

Why Do You Support The Act?

"Many people are pointing out how the act excludes people, but nobody is talking about how this is the first time in history that we are granting citizenship to people facing persecution. It's a huge deal. I think the act will benefit so many families and people who have been struggling in these other countries." Sheetal, 34.

"The point of the bill is to grant citizenship, not take it away. These liberals find a way to fit anything into their narrative of "divisive politics." There's nothing divisive about the act, Muslims cannot be minorities in a Muslim country. It's that simple, they are fine and even if they aren't they have other Muslim countries to fall back to. Why do these so-called minorities always ask for more than they have? Can't they just live with what they have?" Jayesh, 46.

"There's only one way to ensure that what happened in Kashmir to the Kashmiri Pandits never happens again. If we erase the root, there will be no problem, there's no other solution. Modi has always made sure he takes the Hindus, who are slowly turning into a minority, into consideration. He's the only leader keen on bringing this nation to its real cultural roots." Radhika, 32.

Why Do You Think People Are Protesting Against The Act?

"Where were these people when the Kashmiri Pandits were being beaten out of their homes? Where were the protests then? Nowhere, those Pandits quietly suffered. This is payback for those actions. Those who are protesting aren't protesting for any human rights, otherwise, they wouldn't be silent about the Pandit atrocities. These protesters are out there being Muslim apologists, it's brainwashing - which the Congress has managed to do very smartly." Sheetal, 34.

"These liberals are on the streets, burning buses and destroying public property, there's no way these are "desh-bhakts." They have no idea what it means to be loyal to your country, first of all, they are anti-Modi and hate everything he does. Even if the man does something right, how do you expect these people to appreciate anything he does? They won't. They love their Pappu (Rahul Gandhi) and Italian mother (Sonia Gandhi) and they are loyal only to them, not the nation." Jayesh, 46.

"If you ask even one person at the protest why they chose to come out, I'm sure no one will know why. It's a fashion statement now to be a part of these big protests and whatnot, that's why we see Deepika Padukone and Anurag Kashyap there - they want to be popular. Students want to miss classes, and they have no value for the people around them, the traffic protests cause is terrible, but why would they care about anybody else? Pseudo-secularists." Radhika, 32.

What Do You Think Of The Violence In Jamia, JNU, and AMU?

"See the police has a job, they're supposed to react when they're instigated. They're also human after all. Burning buses and expecting the Police to remain silent is just stupid. JNU students have been known for all the anti-national sloganeering and tukde tukde dialogues, the violence there was probably done by them as a way of framing the government who they clearly hate. As far as AMU is concerned, I don't know what happened there so I will not comment." Sheetal, 34.

"Nobody asked students to come on the streets, they did it knowing fully well what the consequences were. What more can be said? If you think you're being a "freedom fighter" then be ready to die, get beaten up and toughen up a little. You go there thinking you're so cool, and when actions are taken you complain. Don't be a hypocrite, either man up or let it be and study like you're supposed to." Jayesh, 46.

"How is it that every time it's some Muslim university on the face of controversy like this? There's a reason why. These universities are clearly affiliated with the communists, they are simply spreading their propaganda and then they cry when there are actions taken against them. There is no sense anymore. Under the name of democracy, there is rioting, anti-Hindu propaganda and anti-national slogans. What democracy allows this? None. There will be violence if you behave like this." Radhika, 32.

The Citizenship Amendment Act has been put into effect since the 10th of January amid country-wide protests and resistance.

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