Culture

Check Out What British Chefs Have Been Doing With Waste Food!

In recent times, people in Britain have been taking efforts to reduce food wastage, which has led to some of the world’s first zero-waste restaurants opening up there. Douglas McMaster as a young chef had seen a lot of food being wasted, like gem lettuce being peeled into the dustbin, only their root being used for garnish!

In recent times, people in Britain have been taking efforts to reduce food wastage, which has led to some of the world’s first zero-waste restaurants opening up there. Douglas McMaster as a young chef had seen a lot of food being wasted, like gem lettuce being peeled into the dustbin, only their root being used for garnish!
"We like to think of zero waste as not having a bin," says McMaster. He was the one to open Britain’s first zero-waste restaurants. This is an imperative priority that we have right now, as we are now producing more food than we have ever done before and most of it is going to waste. In fact, globally, one third of all food produced – worth nearly $1 trillion – is thrown away every year, according to the United Nations's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

McMaster opened his restaurant, Silo, in Brighton on the south coast of England in 2014, sourcing from local farmers, avoiding packaging, and trying to put everything into dishes, including byproducts. Whey left from making cheese transforms into sauce for potatoes, while bread crusts become miso soup, McMaster said.  Inedible parts such as bones and egg shells are given back to the farmers to be used as compost.
We could really use restaurants like these in large numbers in India. Saving a fraction of the food that is wasted could help 815 million people to not go to bed hungry every night.

What are your thoughts on this? Would you like to see restaurants like this in India? Let us know in the comments section below!

Culture

Check Out What British Chefs Have Been Doing With Waste Food!

In recent times, people in Britain have been taking efforts to reduce food wastage, which has led to some of the world’s first zero-waste restaurants opening up there. Douglas McMaster as a young chef had seen a lot of food being wasted, like gem lettuce being peeled into the dustbin, only their root being used for garnish!

In recent times, people in Britain have been taking efforts to reduce food wastage, which has led to some of the world’s first zero-waste restaurants opening up there. Douglas McMaster as a young chef had seen a lot of food being wasted, like gem lettuce being peeled into the dustbin, only their root being used for garnish!
"We like to think of zero waste as not having a bin," says McMaster. He was the one to open Britain’s first zero-waste restaurants. This is an imperative priority that we have right now, as we are now producing more food than we have ever done before and most of it is going to waste. In fact, globally, one third of all food produced – worth nearly $1 trillion – is thrown away every year, according to the United Nations's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

McMaster opened his restaurant, Silo, in Brighton on the south coast of England in 2014, sourcing from local farmers, avoiding packaging, and trying to put everything into dishes, including byproducts. Whey left from making cheese transforms into sauce for potatoes, while bread crusts become miso soup, McMaster said.  Inedible parts such as bones and egg shells are given back to the farmers to be used as compost.
We could really use restaurants like these in large numbers in India. Saving a fraction of the food that is wasted could help 815 million people to not go to bed hungry every night.

What are your thoughts on this? Would you like to see restaurants like this in India? Let us know in the comments section below!

Culture

Check Out What British Chefs Have Been Doing With Waste Food!

In recent times, people in Britain have been taking efforts to reduce food wastage, which has led to some of the world’s first zero-waste restaurants opening up there. Douglas McMaster as a young chef had seen a lot of food being wasted, like gem lettuce being peeled into the dustbin, only their root being used for garnish!

In recent times, people in Britain have been taking efforts to reduce food wastage, which has led to some of the world’s first zero-waste restaurants opening up there. Douglas McMaster as a young chef had seen a lot of food being wasted, like gem lettuce being peeled into the dustbin, only their root being used for garnish!
"We like to think of zero waste as not having a bin," says McMaster. He was the one to open Britain’s first zero-waste restaurants. This is an imperative priority that we have right now, as we are now producing more food than we have ever done before and most of it is going to waste. In fact, globally, one third of all food produced – worth nearly $1 trillion – is thrown away every year, according to the United Nations's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

McMaster opened his restaurant, Silo, in Brighton on the south coast of England in 2014, sourcing from local farmers, avoiding packaging, and trying to put everything into dishes, including byproducts. Whey left from making cheese transforms into sauce for potatoes, while bread crusts become miso soup, McMaster said.  Inedible parts such as bones and egg shells are given back to the farmers to be used as compost.
We could really use restaurants like these in large numbers in India. Saving a fraction of the food that is wasted could help 815 million people to not go to bed hungry every night.

What are your thoughts on this? Would you like to see restaurants like this in India? Let us know in the comments section below!

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