Article headline
Trends

Explained: How Are Human Penis Sizes Shrinking Due To Pollution?

Swan explains that pollutants and chemicals are reducing semen quality and as a consequence penis sizes are shrinking along with the volume of testes.

The World Air Quality Report in 2020 declared that India has 22 out of the 30 most polluted cities in the world. While Ghaziabad was called to be the second most polluted city, it was followed by Bulandshahar, Bisrakh Jalalpur, and the National Capital New Delhi was ranked to be the tenth most polluted city in the world. While pollution has deep rooting impacts on both humans and the environment, a study has discovered that pollution is having an effect on the penis sizes of males leading to lower sperm counts and erectile dysfunction.

How does pollution impact penis sizes?

In 2017, Dr. Shanna H. Swan, who is a renowned environmental and reproductive epidemiologist co-authored a study that discovered sperm counts reducing in the West by 59 percent between 1973 and 2011. In her new book titled, “Count Down: How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race”, she explores the devastative impact of chemicals on penis shrinkage, low sperm count, and low fertility rates.

“Chemicals in our environment and unhealthy lifestyle practices in our modern world are disrupting our hormonal balance, causing various degrees of reproductive havoc,” she wrote.

Swan explains that pollutants and chemicals are reducing semen quality and as a consequence penis sizes are shrinking along with the volume of testes. Calling this to be a “global existential crisis”, Swan says, “The current state of reproductive affairs can’t continue much longer without threatening human survival,” she writes. “Of five possible criteria for what makes a species endangered, only one needs to be met; the current state of affairs for humans meets at least three.”

Where are these chemicals commonly found?

The research concluded that a shorter anogenital distance (AGD) is caused by chemicals existing in plastics and toys, at the end of the first trimester in the womb.

Talking to The Intercept, Swan said, “I have a paper from 1912 that looks at AGD and showed that they were nearly 100 percent longer in males than in females. Our work has shown that chemicals, including the diethylhexyl phthalate, shorten the AGD in males.”

Melbourne scientists in A 2018 study stated that chemicals in plastics are causing genital defects in male babies. Further, researchers from France’s national public health agency this year studied young boys who lived in polluted regions of coal mining and found that they were twice more prone to have one descended testicle and five times likely vulnerable to have two undescended testicles.

Are women impacted by pollution too?

Swan also discovered that Chemicals and pollutants can also impact one’s libido. “Yes, we found a relationship between women’s phthalate levels and their sexual satisfaction,” Swan stated.

“And researchers in China found that workers with higher levels of bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, in their blood were more likely to have sexual problems, including decreased desire,” she added.

Swan’s research confirms that the decreasing libido and fertility is due to the effects of BPA, phthalate, parabens, and atrazine. Commonly found in plastics, herbicides, toothpaste, and beauty products, these chemicals disrupt your endocrines leading to premature birth, lower IQs, obesity and, smaller penis size.

What measures should the future generation adopt against these hazards?

There is no doubt on the fact that reduced fertility and toxic chemicals can be detrimental to the future generation. Swan states, “If you’re pregnant, and you’re carrying a boy, the chemicals you’re exposed to can pass to him through the placenta. So the germ cells that will create his children are already affected. Plus that boy is exposed to chemicals again as an adult. It’s a two-hit model.”

“That’s why we have this continuing decline in fertility and sperm quality. If we didn’t have a hit from our parents and our grandparents, then each generation would just start all over again. It would be bad, but the impact would be at the same level each time. The fact that we carry with us the problems of the past generations means that we’re starting at a lower level and getting hit again and again and again,” she adds.

Thus, as a possible means to tackle the problem, Swan recommends buying organic products and cut down on plastic uses in our everyday life. She further advocates consuming home-cooked food instead of outside ones to save yourself from the phthalates transferred in your food by the food packages and gloves used by restaurant workers.

Thus, Swan emphasizes, “We must do what we can to safeguard our fertility, the fate of mankind, and the planet.”

Trends

Explained: How Are Human Penis Sizes Shrinking Due To Pollution?

Swan explains that pollutants and chemicals are reducing semen quality and as a consequence penis sizes are shrinking along with the volume of testes.

The World Air Quality Report in 2020 declared that India has 22 out of the 30 most polluted cities in the world. While Ghaziabad was called to be the second most polluted city, it was followed by Bulandshahar, Bisrakh Jalalpur, and the National Capital New Delhi was ranked to be the tenth most polluted city in the world. While pollution has deep rooting impacts on both humans and the environment, a study has discovered that pollution is having an effect on the penis sizes of males leading to lower sperm counts and erectile dysfunction.

How does pollution impact penis sizes?

In 2017, Dr. Shanna H. Swan, who is a renowned environmental and reproductive epidemiologist co-authored a study that discovered sperm counts reducing in the West by 59 percent between 1973 and 2011. In her new book titled, “Count Down: How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race”, she explores the devastative impact of chemicals on penis shrinkage, low sperm count, and low fertility rates.

“Chemicals in our environment and unhealthy lifestyle practices in our modern world are disrupting our hormonal balance, causing various degrees of reproductive havoc,” she wrote.

Swan explains that pollutants and chemicals are reducing semen quality and as a consequence penis sizes are shrinking along with the volume of testes. Calling this to be a “global existential crisis”, Swan says, “The current state of reproductive affairs can’t continue much longer without threatening human survival,” she writes. “Of five possible criteria for what makes a species endangered, only one needs to be met; the current state of affairs for humans meets at least three.”

Where are these chemicals commonly found?

The research concluded that a shorter anogenital distance (AGD) is caused by chemicals existing in plastics and toys, at the end of the first trimester in the womb.

Talking to The Intercept, Swan said, “I have a paper from 1912 that looks at AGD and showed that they were nearly 100 percent longer in males than in females. Our work has shown that chemicals, including the diethylhexyl phthalate, shorten the AGD in males.”

Melbourne scientists in A 2018 study stated that chemicals in plastics are causing genital defects in male babies. Further, researchers from France’s national public health agency this year studied young boys who lived in polluted regions of coal mining and found that they were twice more prone to have one descended testicle and five times likely vulnerable to have two undescended testicles.

Are women impacted by pollution too?

Swan also discovered that Chemicals and pollutants can also impact one’s libido. “Yes, we found a relationship between women’s phthalate levels and their sexual satisfaction,” Swan stated.

“And researchers in China found that workers with higher levels of bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, in their blood were more likely to have sexual problems, including decreased desire,” she added.

Swan’s research confirms that the decreasing libido and fertility is due to the effects of BPA, phthalate, parabens, and atrazine. Commonly found in plastics, herbicides, toothpaste, and beauty products, these chemicals disrupt your endocrines leading to premature birth, lower IQs, obesity and, smaller penis size.

What measures should the future generation adopt against these hazards?

There is no doubt on the fact that reduced fertility and toxic chemicals can be detrimental to the future generation. Swan states, “If you’re pregnant, and you’re carrying a boy, the chemicals you’re exposed to can pass to him through the placenta. So the germ cells that will create his children are already affected. Plus that boy is exposed to chemicals again as an adult. It’s a two-hit model.”

“That’s why we have this continuing decline in fertility and sperm quality. If we didn’t have a hit from our parents and our grandparents, then each generation would just start all over again. It would be bad, but the impact would be at the same level each time. The fact that we carry with us the problems of the past generations means that we’re starting at a lower level and getting hit again and again and again,” she adds.

Thus, as a possible means to tackle the problem, Swan recommends buying organic products and cut down on plastic uses in our everyday life. She further advocates consuming home-cooked food instead of outside ones to save yourself from the phthalates transferred in your food by the food packages and gloves used by restaurant workers.

Thus, Swan emphasizes, “We must do what we can to safeguard our fertility, the fate of mankind, and the planet.”

Trends

Explained: How Are Human Penis Sizes Shrinking Due To Pollution?

Swan explains that pollutants and chemicals are reducing semen quality and as a consequence penis sizes are shrinking along with the volume of testes.

The World Air Quality Report in 2020 declared that India has 22 out of the 30 most polluted cities in the world. While Ghaziabad was called to be the second most polluted city, it was followed by Bulandshahar, Bisrakh Jalalpur, and the National Capital New Delhi was ranked to be the tenth most polluted city in the world. While pollution has deep rooting impacts on both humans and the environment, a study has discovered that pollution is having an effect on the penis sizes of males leading to lower sperm counts and erectile dysfunction.

How does pollution impact penis sizes?

In 2017, Dr. Shanna H. Swan, who is a renowned environmental and reproductive epidemiologist co-authored a study that discovered sperm counts reducing in the West by 59 percent between 1973 and 2011. In her new book titled, “Count Down: How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race”, she explores the devastative impact of chemicals on penis shrinkage, low sperm count, and low fertility rates.

“Chemicals in our environment and unhealthy lifestyle practices in our modern world are disrupting our hormonal balance, causing various degrees of reproductive havoc,” she wrote.

Swan explains that pollutants and chemicals are reducing semen quality and as a consequence penis sizes are shrinking along with the volume of testes. Calling this to be a “global existential crisis”, Swan says, “The current state of reproductive affairs can’t continue much longer without threatening human survival,” she writes. “Of five possible criteria for what makes a species endangered, only one needs to be met; the current state of affairs for humans meets at least three.”

Where are these chemicals commonly found?

The research concluded that a shorter anogenital distance (AGD) is caused by chemicals existing in plastics and toys, at the end of the first trimester in the womb.

Talking to The Intercept, Swan said, “I have a paper from 1912 that looks at AGD and showed that they were nearly 100 percent longer in males than in females. Our work has shown that chemicals, including the diethylhexyl phthalate, shorten the AGD in males.”

Melbourne scientists in A 2018 study stated that chemicals in plastics are causing genital defects in male babies. Further, researchers from France’s national public health agency this year studied young boys who lived in polluted regions of coal mining and found that they were twice more prone to have one descended testicle and five times likely vulnerable to have two undescended testicles.

Are women impacted by pollution too?

Swan also discovered that Chemicals and pollutants can also impact one’s libido. “Yes, we found a relationship between women’s phthalate levels and their sexual satisfaction,” Swan stated.

“And researchers in China found that workers with higher levels of bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, in their blood were more likely to have sexual problems, including decreased desire,” she added.

Swan’s research confirms that the decreasing libido and fertility is due to the effects of BPA, phthalate, parabens, and atrazine. Commonly found in plastics, herbicides, toothpaste, and beauty products, these chemicals disrupt your endocrines leading to premature birth, lower IQs, obesity and, smaller penis size.

What measures should the future generation adopt against these hazards?

There is no doubt on the fact that reduced fertility and toxic chemicals can be detrimental to the future generation. Swan states, “If you’re pregnant, and you’re carrying a boy, the chemicals you’re exposed to can pass to him through the placenta. So the germ cells that will create his children are already affected. Plus that boy is exposed to chemicals again as an adult. It’s a two-hit model.”

“That’s why we have this continuing decline in fertility and sperm quality. If we didn’t have a hit from our parents and our grandparents, then each generation would just start all over again. It would be bad, but the impact would be at the same level each time. The fact that we carry with us the problems of the past generations means that we’re starting at a lower level and getting hit again and again and again,” she adds.

Thus, as a possible means to tackle the problem, Swan recommends buying organic products and cut down on plastic uses in our everyday life. She further advocates consuming home-cooked food instead of outside ones to save yourself from the phthalates transferred in your food by the food packages and gloves used by restaurant workers.

Thus, Swan emphasizes, “We must do what we can to safeguard our fertility, the fate of mankind, and the planet.”

WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO
WATCH VIDEO