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Entertainment

Facebook Is Now Allowing Musicians To Charge For Live Concerts Online!

Facebook in a new move is allowing artists to charge for live concerts they hold online. Users will have to pay for seeing their artists on the web

We are seeing a new normal develop during the pandemic. Masks have become a common sight, everyone is washing their hands correctly and social distancing is the norm of the day.

However, there’s another thing that’s gaining traction online. Live online concerts by musicians. The coronavirus pandemic has shut down the live music business. With shows cancelled and no date set on when public gatherings will be allowed again, many musicians are now shifting online to connect with their fans, and maybe earn a bit of money along the way.

Live Stream Concerts Are The New Norm

The lockdown initially saw a stream of online events prop up. From live concerts to new covers, artists were coming up with innovative ways to interact with their audiences and keep them entertained.

Go online and you could catch a live concert on Instagram live or a new song being sung by your favourite artist on Facebook. This allowed you to enjoy music and have something similar to a live experience, from the comfort of your homes.

The live concerts have surely been fun. You get a sneak peek into the homes or recording studios of these artists while at the same time having the joy of hearing them live. While it doesn’t match the thrill and experience of a live concert, in times like these, anything will do honestly.

Many Indian artists were seen doing this too, from Prateek Kuhad to Ankur Tewari all organizing an online show.

Why Paid Live Concerts May Be The New Normal 

However, with live concerts not happening right now, no one stands to lose more than the artists who collect the vast majority of ticket sales.

With time, an unprecedented change is visible in the music industry. The birth of online paid concerts.

In theory, this makes complete sense for the musicians. They earn for their skill, and even they have bills to pay. Live streaming concerts will allow artists to make their shows available online for a small fee. Additionally, this will also allow them to reach a greater audience than they would be able to if they were on a live tour. 

It also allows them to globalize their art. With is no limit to the number of people who can buy into the online events, fans from around the world can tune in.

Hosting a live concert on the internet is quite simple as the artists have found out. It is also cost-effective on both sites. There are no entourage and booking venue costs, allowing artists to price the concerts lower as well. Live concerts online also ensure that the majority of the earnings go directly to the artists, as middlemen such as event organizers are not involved.

Patreon Gains Popularity During Lockdown

With artists looking to go online with their concerts, several companies have benefitted as a result. Patreon is a platform which allows artists to charge viewers or “patrons” for a subscription to their live streams. The company said that it garnered 30,000 new creators in the first three weeks of March alone.

While the platform was already a popular one, it has gained more traction since the start of the pandemic. The platform allows artists to hold both patron-only and public live streams, allowing them to maintain a balance between free and paid concerts.     

Patreon also has certain other advantages which are benefitting it to gain greater popularity with artists. It allows you to stream in HD, while simultaneously allowing you to stream on other social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook and Periscope

Other services unique to it include a landing page ahead of the event that allows you to notify fans about the concert beforehand, advanced analytics, accept payments and even real-time chat feature for better engagement.

Facebook Allows Artists To Charge For Their Live Concerts

Even social media platforms have hopped onto this upcoming trend. Facebook was the latest to announce a list of changes to its website. One of these allowed artists to monetise their online performances.

The platform has come up with a model that will allow pages to host only Facebook events. Those who want access to these events can be charged a fee which will provide permission to view these live streams.

Facebook also plans on bringing back its co-broadcasting feature “Live-With”. This will allow the host to invite other participants to the live stream. For musicians this could be a great thing, giving them the facility to invite their band or even one of the fans to the stream to enhance the experience of the online event.

 

While the timeline of these features hasn’t been announced yet, we can be sure we’ll see them soon to make the most of this stay at home period. So get ready and warm up to the idea of live concerts online, because it may just become a reality.

Entertainment

Facebook Is Now Allowing Musicians To Charge For Live Concerts Online!

Facebook in a new move is allowing artists to charge for live concerts they hold online. Users will have to pay for seeing their artists on the web

We are seeing a new normal develop during the pandemic. Masks have become a common sight, everyone is washing their hands correctly and social distancing is the norm of the day.

However, there’s another thing that’s gaining traction online. Live online concerts by musicians. The coronavirus pandemic has shut down the live music business. With shows cancelled and no date set on when public gatherings will be allowed again, many musicians are now shifting online to connect with their fans, and maybe earn a bit of money along the way.

Live Stream Concerts Are The New Norm

The lockdown initially saw a stream of online events prop up. From live concerts to new covers, artists were coming up with innovative ways to interact with their audiences and keep them entertained.

Go online and you could catch a live concert on Instagram live or a new song being sung by your favourite artist on Facebook. This allowed you to enjoy music and have something similar to a live experience, from the comfort of your homes.

The live concerts have surely been fun. You get a sneak peek into the homes or recording studios of these artists while at the same time having the joy of hearing them live. While it doesn’t match the thrill and experience of a live concert, in times like these, anything will do honestly.

Many Indian artists were seen doing this too, from Prateek Kuhad to Ankur Tewari all organizing an online show.

Why Paid Live Concerts May Be The New Normal 

However, with live concerts not happening right now, no one stands to lose more than the artists who collect the vast majority of ticket sales.

With time, an unprecedented change is visible in the music industry. The birth of online paid concerts.

In theory, this makes complete sense for the musicians. They earn for their skill, and even they have bills to pay. Live streaming concerts will allow artists to make their shows available online for a small fee. Additionally, this will also allow them to reach a greater audience than they would be able to if they were on a live tour. 

It also allows them to globalize their art. With is no limit to the number of people who can buy into the online events, fans from around the world can tune in.

Hosting a live concert on the internet is quite simple as the artists have found out. It is also cost-effective on both sites. There are no entourage and booking venue costs, allowing artists to price the concerts lower as well. Live concerts online also ensure that the majority of the earnings go directly to the artists, as middlemen such as event organizers are not involved.

Patreon Gains Popularity During Lockdown

With artists looking to go online with their concerts, several companies have benefitted as a result. Patreon is a platform which allows artists to charge viewers or “patrons” for a subscription to their live streams. The company said that it garnered 30,000 new creators in the first three weeks of March alone.

While the platform was already a popular one, it has gained more traction since the start of the pandemic. The platform allows artists to hold both patron-only and public live streams, allowing them to maintain a balance between free and paid concerts.     

Patreon also has certain other advantages which are benefitting it to gain greater popularity with artists. It allows you to stream in HD, while simultaneously allowing you to stream on other social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook and Periscope

Other services unique to it include a landing page ahead of the event that allows you to notify fans about the concert beforehand, advanced analytics, accept payments and even real-time chat feature for better engagement.

Facebook Allows Artists To Charge For Their Live Concerts

Even social media platforms have hopped onto this upcoming trend. Facebook was the latest to announce a list of changes to its website. One of these allowed artists to monetise their online performances.

The platform has come up with a model that will allow pages to host only Facebook events. Those who want access to these events can be charged a fee which will provide permission to view these live streams.

Facebook also plans on bringing back its co-broadcasting feature “Live-With”. This will allow the host to invite other participants to the live stream. For musicians this could be a great thing, giving them the facility to invite their band or even one of the fans to the stream to enhance the experience of the online event.

 

While the timeline of these features hasn’t been announced yet, we can be sure we’ll see them soon to make the most of this stay at home period. So get ready and warm up to the idea of live concerts online, because it may just become a reality.

Entertainment

Facebook Is Now Allowing Musicians To Charge For Live Concerts Online!

Facebook in a new move is allowing artists to charge for live concerts they hold online. Users will have to pay for seeing their artists on the web

We are seeing a new normal develop during the pandemic. Masks have become a common sight, everyone is washing their hands correctly and social distancing is the norm of the day.

However, there’s another thing that’s gaining traction online. Live online concerts by musicians. The coronavirus pandemic has shut down the live music business. With shows cancelled and no date set on when public gatherings will be allowed again, many musicians are now shifting online to connect with their fans, and maybe earn a bit of money along the way.

Live Stream Concerts Are The New Norm

The lockdown initially saw a stream of online events prop up. From live concerts to new covers, artists were coming up with innovative ways to interact with their audiences and keep them entertained.

Go online and you could catch a live concert on Instagram live or a new song being sung by your favourite artist on Facebook. This allowed you to enjoy music and have something similar to a live experience, from the comfort of your homes.

The live concerts have surely been fun. You get a sneak peek into the homes or recording studios of these artists while at the same time having the joy of hearing them live. While it doesn’t match the thrill and experience of a live concert, in times like these, anything will do honestly.

Many Indian artists were seen doing this too, from Prateek Kuhad to Ankur Tewari all organizing an online show.

Why Paid Live Concerts May Be The New Normal 

However, with live concerts not happening right now, no one stands to lose more than the artists who collect the vast majority of ticket sales.

With time, an unprecedented change is visible in the music industry. The birth of online paid concerts.

In theory, this makes complete sense for the musicians. They earn for their skill, and even they have bills to pay. Live streaming concerts will allow artists to make their shows available online for a small fee. Additionally, this will also allow them to reach a greater audience than they would be able to if they were on a live tour. 

It also allows them to globalize their art. With is no limit to the number of people who can buy into the online events, fans from around the world can tune in.

Hosting a live concert on the internet is quite simple as the artists have found out. It is also cost-effective on both sites. There are no entourage and booking venue costs, allowing artists to price the concerts lower as well. Live concerts online also ensure that the majority of the earnings go directly to the artists, as middlemen such as event organizers are not involved.

Patreon Gains Popularity During Lockdown

With artists looking to go online with their concerts, several companies have benefitted as a result. Patreon is a platform which allows artists to charge viewers or “patrons” for a subscription to their live streams. The company said that it garnered 30,000 new creators in the first three weeks of March alone.

While the platform was already a popular one, it has gained more traction since the start of the pandemic. The platform allows artists to hold both patron-only and public live streams, allowing them to maintain a balance between free and paid concerts.     

Patreon also has certain other advantages which are benefitting it to gain greater popularity with artists. It allows you to stream in HD, while simultaneously allowing you to stream on other social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook and Periscope

Other services unique to it include a landing page ahead of the event that allows you to notify fans about the concert beforehand, advanced analytics, accept payments and even real-time chat feature for better engagement.

Facebook Allows Artists To Charge For Their Live Concerts

Even social media platforms have hopped onto this upcoming trend. Facebook was the latest to announce a list of changes to its website. One of these allowed artists to monetise their online performances.

The platform has come up with a model that will allow pages to host only Facebook events. Those who want access to these events can be charged a fee which will provide permission to view these live streams.

Facebook also plans on bringing back its co-broadcasting feature “Live-With”. This will allow the host to invite other participants to the live stream. For musicians this could be a great thing, giving them the facility to invite their band or even one of the fans to the stream to enhance the experience of the online event.

 

While the timeline of these features hasn’t been announced yet, we can be sure we’ll see them soon to make the most of this stay at home period. So get ready and warm up to the idea of live concerts online, because it may just become a reality.

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