Sex

All You’d Want To Know About Female Viagra in India

In 2015, Addyi, the first 'female viagra' was introduced and women all over the world were enthralled by it. Here are all the deets on the pink pill.

Sildenafil or Viagra, that old trustworthy drug that sets penises straight and rock hard returning men’s lost sexual prowess to them; yes, we've all heard about this magic pill that forms a multi-million dollar industry. But have you heard of female viagra? Yeah, we didn't think so, it’s no surprise this isn’t common knowledge as female sexuality rarely ever sees the spotlight let alone the center stage.

You would be glad to know that such a pill exists, after all, it's been almost 22 years since Viagra hit the markets while the market offered nothing to its female consumers. Unlike women, men always had the luxury of using a range of pills and even ayurvedic substances like Shilajit to enhance their libido. That was until 2015, the year the first-ever female sex drive pill called Flibanserin got FDA approval; it was marketed under the brand name Addyi by Sprout Pharmaceuticals.

It was originally approved as a drug for premenopausal women who were diagnosed with 'hypoactive sexual desire disorder', which the FDA defines as 'low sexual desire that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty and is not due to a co-existing medical or psychiatric condition, relationship problems, or other medication'. So, it could only be prescribed to women diagnosed with that condition.

There's more - in 2019, the FDA had approved Vyleesi or Bremelanotide, a drug usually administered through an injection as a libido-boosting drug for women. Women finally had options to choose from and hope for a quick solution to their frustratingly low sex drive but before you jump the gun and place an order for Addyi, let's take a closer look at these libido-enhancing wonder drugs.

What is female viagra?

The concept of female viagra is not straightforward at all, in fact, it cannot be compared to Viagra for men in any sense, except that they're both 'supposed' to increase libido but there's a huge polarity in how they work. A little history behind the pursuit of creating a pharmaceutical drug for women’s libido will make this clearer.

Originally, Flibanserin was developed as an anti-depressant for all sexes but it failed to launch due to inconclusive results in their trials on depressed people. So, Boehringer Ingelheim, the company that made the drug, instead used one of its side-effects - boost in sexual desire- to remarket it as a sex drive enhancing drug. But the 'pink pill' was again questioned on its efficacy and the FDA wasn't convinced that its effects justified the concerning side-effects such as low blood pressure, fainting, nausea and fatigue. Eventually, Ingelheim gave up the fight and cancelled the project after that.

Then swooped in, the CEO of Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Cindy Whitehead to buy the rights for the pill and continue research on it until it was accepted by the FDA, which it was in 2015 when she released the shiny-new pink pill - Addyi.

“It became a cause for me,” Cindy tells FastCompany, “I really felt that the reason that they were walking away was, in fact, because of a societal narrative that has frankly gone on for too long. It’s that which reduces all things in the bedroom for men to biology … and all things in the bedroom for women to psychology. The truth is we both bring both things into the bedroom, and women were being completely underserved in having no biological treatment options.”

Why do people take female viagra?

Any woman that feels like she’s experiencing sexual dysfunction like vaginal dryness, issues with sustaining or achieving orgasm and issues with libido may want to seek female viagra.

A doctor will most likely only prescribe Addyi to women after cancelling out all the other factors or if they have Female Sexual Arousal Disorder. Senior Sex Therapist and Counsellor Dr Rajan B. Bhonsle explains the symptoms of the disorder, “Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD) is characterised by lack of sexual desire, decreased libido and lack of lubrication, causing difficult or painful intercourse or the inability to climax. Anyone or a combination of these symptoms can hinder a woman from having a satisfying sexual alliance.”

How does female viagra work?

According to Dr Karen E. Adams, Director of the Midlife Women’s Clinic at Oregon Health and Science University, Addyi, the female viagra works differently from Viagra in a couple of ways. For men, Viagra works almost 100% of the time but Addyi only works for 1 in 10 women deeming it substantially less effective than Viagra. Three 24-week clinical trials (which led to Addyi’s FDA approval) showed that about 1 in 10 participants said their symptoms were “much” or “very much” improved from weeks 8 to 24; the results are promising but there needs to be much more improvement.

Viagra increases blood flow to the penis to result in a boner whereas Flibanserin stimulates arousal through neurotransmitters in the brain, akin to antidepressants. Viagra is a much safer and convenient drug as men can take it whenever they want to have sexual intercourse, however, women have to take flibanserin every day and you'd have to wait for an excruciatingly long month before you begin seeing effects.

In fact, peak effects aren't seen until eight weeks. All these conditions make it appear like a less attractive option when you consider the fact that women have to take it every day and are still not guaranteed 100% results.

When you read the fine print and learn about the side-effects, Addyi raises even more doubts. According to the FDA, the most common adverse reactions associated with the use of Addyi are sleepiness, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, insomnia and dry mouth.

Imagine experiencing these every day, most women would say it's really not worth it. Dr Adams tells Forbes that it can be dangerous for women with blood pressure conditions, "Say a woman already has a blood pressure condition. Then you add this drug, and she’s fainting at work or while driving."

Oh, did we mention that you can never drink alcohol while on Addyi? Yes, there's a strong warning against mixing alcohol with Addyi because it can cause a severe drop in blood pressure and make you unconscious. You also need to ask your doctor for guidance as there are several other drugs you shouldn't mix Addyi with.

This will definitely be a problem for women who enjoy a drink to ‘get in the mood’ and lower inhibitions so making this trade-off with the pill might not be something they would want. Dr Adams says that it's very likely that women would take this warning lightly and say, "Oh, it’s fine, so I’ll have a little glass of wine, and we’ll see,” and that's when things can go seriously downhill. Imagine fainting in the middle of a date! It makes one think if the pill is really worth the risk.

The second option that women have is Vyleesi or Bremelanotide which hit the markets in June 2019. It's not a pill but an injection that you take under the skin of your abdomen or thigh at least 45 minutes prior to sexual activity. You can take Vyleesi only once every 24 hours, and it comes with a limit of eight uses per month. If you’re uncomfortable around needles, this might not be for you.

According to trials, 25% of Vylessi users felt an increase in sexual arousal, a very low turnout. Dr Paul Gittens, a board-certified urologist who works with men and women at the Centers for Sexual Medicine in Philadelphia and New York tells Greatist that researchers are still not sure how this works. "It likely stimulates dopamine neurotransmitters in that area of the brain, which stimulates sexual function,” he hypothesises.

The most common side effects of Vyleesi are nausea or vomiting, fatigue, flushing of the skin, headache, skin reaction at the injection site and tingling. Additionally, you shouldn't use Vyleesi if you have high blood pressure. Forbes reported that 40% of the clinical trial participants for Vylessi experienced nausea with 13% having to take anti-nausea medications because it was so severe.

I know what you're thinking, - 'Don't women have an option where they're not pricked by a needle or compelled to stay abstinent from their favourite drink?' We're still in the preliminary stages of a female viagra so it might be a while till we can create a convenient chemical fix for low libido in women. As mentioned earlier, women's sexual desire is complicated, and some experts aren't even sure that a pill is really the cure for women's declining sex mojo.

Benefits of female viagra

The two available choices that we have as 'female viagra' show modest benefits but they're nowhere near the success rate of Viagra. But it should be noted that both the drugs are treating different conditions; Viagra is treating Erectile dysfunction (ED) which is a relatively straightforward mechanical issue concerning the penis. Men with ED don't necessarily have a lack of interest in sex, they just can't seem to show it through an erection.

However, for women, it’s a broader condition as women's sexuality has complexities we still can’t quite comprehend. It's not as simple as increasing blood flow to the vagina or clitoris but based on a myriad of factors such as brain chemistry, mood, relationships, medications and health statuses.

A sexologist and behavioural scientist, Dr Frances Quirk tells ABC about the socio-cultural benefits that the introduction of such a drug will lead to. She says it may not be the answer to women's prayers for higher arousal but she still views it as a 'game-changer' that will trigger conversations about female sexuality and more women would come forward and consult doctors for problems in their sex life.

"Women's concerns about sexual wellbeing", she says, " are dismissed or not taken seriously. They'll often be told, 'oh well, it's just your age' you know, that sort of thing. Women's sexuality is devalued."

She compares the available treatments for low libido between women and men, "We've had nearly 20 years where men could present to their doctor with a sexual health problem and there was something that could be offered to them."

It's evident that female sexuality is underresearched, in fact, Addyi wasn't even supposed to be a sexual arousal pill, it was an antidepressant that had a side-effect resulting in arousal. If female sexuality appears like an unsolvable puzzle, that’s only because such few researchers and pharmaceutical companies have put their money to give women their very own viagra. The pill could've been the answer if it had better benefits but if you have a low sex drive, according to Dr Adams, "it’s better to look at all the potential causes (psychological and physical) of why you may not have a sex drive" before choosing the pill.

Sex

All You’d Want To Know About Female Viagra in India

In 2015, Addyi, the first 'female viagra' was introduced and women all over the world were enthralled by it. Here are all the deets on the pink pill.

Sildenafil or Viagra, that old trustworthy drug that sets penises straight and rock hard returning men’s lost sexual prowess to them; yes, we've all heard about this magic pill that forms a multi-million dollar industry. But have you heard of female viagra? Yeah, we didn't think so, it’s no surprise this isn’t common knowledge as female sexuality rarely ever sees the spotlight let alone the center stage.

You would be glad to know that such a pill exists, after all, it's been almost 22 years since Viagra hit the markets while the market offered nothing to its female consumers. Unlike women, men always had the luxury of using a range of pills and even ayurvedic substances like Shilajit to enhance their libido. That was until 2015, the year the first-ever female sex drive pill called Flibanserin got FDA approval; it was marketed under the brand name Addyi by Sprout Pharmaceuticals.

It was originally approved as a drug for premenopausal women who were diagnosed with 'hypoactive sexual desire disorder', which the FDA defines as 'low sexual desire that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty and is not due to a co-existing medical or psychiatric condition, relationship problems, or other medication'. So, it could only be prescribed to women diagnosed with that condition.

There's more - in 2019, the FDA had approved Vyleesi or Bremelanotide, a drug usually administered through an injection as a libido-boosting drug for women. Women finally had options to choose from and hope for a quick solution to their frustratingly low sex drive but before you jump the gun and place an order for Addyi, let's take a closer look at these libido-enhancing wonder drugs.

What is female viagra?

The concept of female viagra is not straightforward at all, in fact, it cannot be compared to Viagra for men in any sense, except that they're both 'supposed' to increase libido but there's a huge polarity in how they work. A little history behind the pursuit of creating a pharmaceutical drug for women’s libido will make this clearer.

Originally, Flibanserin was developed as an anti-depressant for all sexes but it failed to launch due to inconclusive results in their trials on depressed people. So, Boehringer Ingelheim, the company that made the drug, instead used one of its side-effects - boost in sexual desire- to remarket it as a sex drive enhancing drug. But the 'pink pill' was again questioned on its efficacy and the FDA wasn't convinced that its effects justified the concerning side-effects such as low blood pressure, fainting, nausea and fatigue. Eventually, Ingelheim gave up the fight and cancelled the project after that.

Then swooped in, the CEO of Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Cindy Whitehead to buy the rights for the pill and continue research on it until it was accepted by the FDA, which it was in 2015 when she released the shiny-new pink pill - Addyi.

“It became a cause for me,” Cindy tells FastCompany, “I really felt that the reason that they were walking away was, in fact, because of a societal narrative that has frankly gone on for too long. It’s that which reduces all things in the bedroom for men to biology … and all things in the bedroom for women to psychology. The truth is we both bring both things into the bedroom, and women were being completely underserved in having no biological treatment options.”

Why do people take female viagra?

Any woman that feels like she’s experiencing sexual dysfunction like vaginal dryness, issues with sustaining or achieving orgasm and issues with libido may want to seek female viagra.

A doctor will most likely only prescribe Addyi to women after cancelling out all the other factors or if they have Female Sexual Arousal Disorder. Senior Sex Therapist and Counsellor Dr Rajan B. Bhonsle explains the symptoms of the disorder, “Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD) is characterised by lack of sexual desire, decreased libido and lack of lubrication, causing difficult or painful intercourse or the inability to climax. Anyone or a combination of these symptoms can hinder a woman from having a satisfying sexual alliance.”

How does female viagra work?

According to Dr Karen E. Adams, Director of the Midlife Women’s Clinic at Oregon Health and Science University, Addyi, the female viagra works differently from Viagra in a couple of ways. For men, Viagra works almost 100% of the time but Addyi only works for 1 in 10 women deeming it substantially less effective than Viagra. Three 24-week clinical trials (which led to Addyi’s FDA approval) showed that about 1 in 10 participants said their symptoms were “much” or “very much” improved from weeks 8 to 24; the results are promising but there needs to be much more improvement.

Viagra increases blood flow to the penis to result in a boner whereas Flibanserin stimulates arousal through neurotransmitters in the brain, akin to antidepressants. Viagra is a much safer and convenient drug as men can take it whenever they want to have sexual intercourse, however, women have to take flibanserin every day and you'd have to wait for an excruciatingly long month before you begin seeing effects.

In fact, peak effects aren't seen until eight weeks. All these conditions make it appear like a less attractive option when you consider the fact that women have to take it every day and are still not guaranteed 100% results.

When you read the fine print and learn about the side-effects, Addyi raises even more doubts. According to the FDA, the most common adverse reactions associated with the use of Addyi are sleepiness, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, insomnia and dry mouth.

Imagine experiencing these every day, most women would say it's really not worth it. Dr Adams tells Forbes that it can be dangerous for women with blood pressure conditions, "Say a woman already has a blood pressure condition. Then you add this drug, and she’s fainting at work or while driving."

Oh, did we mention that you can never drink alcohol while on Addyi? Yes, there's a strong warning against mixing alcohol with Addyi because it can cause a severe drop in blood pressure and make you unconscious. You also need to ask your doctor for guidance as there are several other drugs you shouldn't mix Addyi with.

This will definitely be a problem for women who enjoy a drink to ‘get in the mood’ and lower inhibitions so making this trade-off with the pill might not be something they would want. Dr Adams says that it's very likely that women would take this warning lightly and say, "Oh, it’s fine, so I’ll have a little glass of wine, and we’ll see,” and that's when things can go seriously downhill. Imagine fainting in the middle of a date! It makes one think if the pill is really worth the risk.

The second option that women have is Vyleesi or Bremelanotide which hit the markets in June 2019. It's not a pill but an injection that you take under the skin of your abdomen or thigh at least 45 minutes prior to sexual activity. You can take Vyleesi only once every 24 hours, and it comes with a limit of eight uses per month. If you’re uncomfortable around needles, this might not be for you.

According to trials, 25% of Vylessi users felt an increase in sexual arousal, a very low turnout. Dr Paul Gittens, a board-certified urologist who works with men and women at the Centers for Sexual Medicine in Philadelphia and New York tells Greatist that researchers are still not sure how this works. "It likely stimulates dopamine neurotransmitters in that area of the brain, which stimulates sexual function,” he hypothesises.

The most common side effects of Vyleesi are nausea or vomiting, fatigue, flushing of the skin, headache, skin reaction at the injection site and tingling. Additionally, you shouldn't use Vyleesi if you have high blood pressure. Forbes reported that 40% of the clinical trial participants for Vylessi experienced nausea with 13% having to take anti-nausea medications because it was so severe.

I know what you're thinking, - 'Don't women have an option where they're not pricked by a needle or compelled to stay abstinent from their favourite drink?' We're still in the preliminary stages of a female viagra so it might be a while till we can create a convenient chemical fix for low libido in women. As mentioned earlier, women's sexual desire is complicated, and some experts aren't even sure that a pill is really the cure for women's declining sex mojo.

Benefits of female viagra

The two available choices that we have as 'female viagra' show modest benefits but they're nowhere near the success rate of Viagra. But it should be noted that both the drugs are treating different conditions; Viagra is treating Erectile dysfunction (ED) which is a relatively straightforward mechanical issue concerning the penis. Men with ED don't necessarily have a lack of interest in sex, they just can't seem to show it through an erection.

However, for women, it’s a broader condition as women's sexuality has complexities we still can’t quite comprehend. It's not as simple as increasing blood flow to the vagina or clitoris but based on a myriad of factors such as brain chemistry, mood, relationships, medications and health statuses.

A sexologist and behavioural scientist, Dr Frances Quirk tells ABC about the socio-cultural benefits that the introduction of such a drug will lead to. She says it may not be the answer to women's prayers for higher arousal but she still views it as a 'game-changer' that will trigger conversations about female sexuality and more women would come forward and consult doctors for problems in their sex life.

"Women's concerns about sexual wellbeing", she says, " are dismissed or not taken seriously. They'll often be told, 'oh well, it's just your age' you know, that sort of thing. Women's sexuality is devalued."

She compares the available treatments for low libido between women and men, "We've had nearly 20 years where men could present to their doctor with a sexual health problem and there was something that could be offered to them."

It's evident that female sexuality is underresearched, in fact, Addyi wasn't even supposed to be a sexual arousal pill, it was an antidepressant that had a side-effect resulting in arousal. If female sexuality appears like an unsolvable puzzle, that’s only because such few researchers and pharmaceutical companies have put their money to give women their very own viagra. The pill could've been the answer if it had better benefits but if you have a low sex drive, according to Dr Adams, "it’s better to look at all the potential causes (psychological and physical) of why you may not have a sex drive" before choosing the pill.

Sex

All You’d Want To Know About Female Viagra in India

In 2015, Addyi, the first 'female viagra' was introduced and women all over the world were enthralled by it. Here are all the deets on the pink pill.

Sildenafil or Viagra, that old trustworthy drug that sets penises straight and rock hard returning men’s lost sexual prowess to them; yes, we've all heard about this magic pill that forms a multi-million dollar industry. But have you heard of female viagra? Yeah, we didn't think so, it’s no surprise this isn’t common knowledge as female sexuality rarely ever sees the spotlight let alone the center stage.

You would be glad to know that such a pill exists, after all, it's been almost 22 years since Viagra hit the markets while the market offered nothing to its female consumers. Unlike women, men always had the luxury of using a range of pills and even ayurvedic substances like Shilajit to enhance their libido. That was until 2015, the year the first-ever female sex drive pill called Flibanserin got FDA approval; it was marketed under the brand name Addyi by Sprout Pharmaceuticals.

It was originally approved as a drug for premenopausal women who were diagnosed with 'hypoactive sexual desire disorder', which the FDA defines as 'low sexual desire that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty and is not due to a co-existing medical or psychiatric condition, relationship problems, or other medication'. So, it could only be prescribed to women diagnosed with that condition.

There's more - in 2019, the FDA had approved Vyleesi or Bremelanotide, a drug usually administered through an injection as a libido-boosting drug for women. Women finally had options to choose from and hope for a quick solution to their frustratingly low sex drive but before you jump the gun and place an order for Addyi, let's take a closer look at these libido-enhancing wonder drugs.

What is female viagra?

The concept of female viagra is not straightforward at all, in fact, it cannot be compared to Viagra for men in any sense, except that they're both 'supposed' to increase libido but there's a huge polarity in how they work. A little history behind the pursuit of creating a pharmaceutical drug for women’s libido will make this clearer.

Originally, Flibanserin was developed as an anti-depressant for all sexes but it failed to launch due to inconclusive results in their trials on depressed people. So, Boehringer Ingelheim, the company that made the drug, instead used one of its side-effects - boost in sexual desire- to remarket it as a sex drive enhancing drug. But the 'pink pill' was again questioned on its efficacy and the FDA wasn't convinced that its effects justified the concerning side-effects such as low blood pressure, fainting, nausea and fatigue. Eventually, Ingelheim gave up the fight and cancelled the project after that.

Then swooped in, the CEO of Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Cindy Whitehead to buy the rights for the pill and continue research on it until it was accepted by the FDA, which it was in 2015 when she released the shiny-new pink pill - Addyi.

“It became a cause for me,” Cindy tells FastCompany, “I really felt that the reason that they were walking away was, in fact, because of a societal narrative that has frankly gone on for too long. It’s that which reduces all things in the bedroom for men to biology … and all things in the bedroom for women to psychology. The truth is we both bring both things into the bedroom, and women were being completely underserved in having no biological treatment options.”

Why do people take female viagra?

Any woman that feels like she’s experiencing sexual dysfunction like vaginal dryness, issues with sustaining or achieving orgasm and issues with libido may want to seek female viagra.

A doctor will most likely only prescribe Addyi to women after cancelling out all the other factors or if they have Female Sexual Arousal Disorder. Senior Sex Therapist and Counsellor Dr Rajan B. Bhonsle explains the symptoms of the disorder, “Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD) is characterised by lack of sexual desire, decreased libido and lack of lubrication, causing difficult or painful intercourse or the inability to climax. Anyone or a combination of these symptoms can hinder a woman from having a satisfying sexual alliance.”

How does female viagra work?

According to Dr Karen E. Adams, Director of the Midlife Women’s Clinic at Oregon Health and Science University, Addyi, the female viagra works differently from Viagra in a couple of ways. For men, Viagra works almost 100% of the time but Addyi only works for 1 in 10 women deeming it substantially less effective than Viagra. Three 24-week clinical trials (which led to Addyi’s FDA approval) showed that about 1 in 10 participants said their symptoms were “much” or “very much” improved from weeks 8 to 24; the results are promising but there needs to be much more improvement.

Viagra increases blood flow to the penis to result in a boner whereas Flibanserin stimulates arousal through neurotransmitters in the brain, akin to antidepressants. Viagra is a much safer and convenient drug as men can take it whenever they want to have sexual intercourse, however, women have to take flibanserin every day and you'd have to wait for an excruciatingly long month before you begin seeing effects.

In fact, peak effects aren't seen until eight weeks. All these conditions make it appear like a less attractive option when you consider the fact that women have to take it every day and are still not guaranteed 100% results.

When you read the fine print and learn about the side-effects, Addyi raises even more doubts. According to the FDA, the most common adverse reactions associated with the use of Addyi are sleepiness, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, insomnia and dry mouth.

Imagine experiencing these every day, most women would say it's really not worth it. Dr Adams tells Forbes that it can be dangerous for women with blood pressure conditions, "Say a woman already has a blood pressure condition. Then you add this drug, and she’s fainting at work or while driving."

Oh, did we mention that you can never drink alcohol while on Addyi? Yes, there's a strong warning against mixing alcohol with Addyi because it can cause a severe drop in blood pressure and make you unconscious. You also need to ask your doctor for guidance as there are several other drugs you shouldn't mix Addyi with.

This will definitely be a problem for women who enjoy a drink to ‘get in the mood’ and lower inhibitions so making this trade-off with the pill might not be something they would want. Dr Adams says that it's very likely that women would take this warning lightly and say, "Oh, it’s fine, so I’ll have a little glass of wine, and we’ll see,” and that's when things can go seriously downhill. Imagine fainting in the middle of a date! It makes one think if the pill is really worth the risk.

The second option that women have is Vyleesi or Bremelanotide which hit the markets in June 2019. It's not a pill but an injection that you take under the skin of your abdomen or thigh at least 45 minutes prior to sexual activity. You can take Vyleesi only once every 24 hours, and it comes with a limit of eight uses per month. If you’re uncomfortable around needles, this might not be for you.

According to trials, 25% of Vylessi users felt an increase in sexual arousal, a very low turnout. Dr Paul Gittens, a board-certified urologist who works with men and women at the Centers for Sexual Medicine in Philadelphia and New York tells Greatist that researchers are still not sure how this works. "It likely stimulates dopamine neurotransmitters in that area of the brain, which stimulates sexual function,” he hypothesises.

The most common side effects of Vyleesi are nausea or vomiting, fatigue, flushing of the skin, headache, skin reaction at the injection site and tingling. Additionally, you shouldn't use Vyleesi if you have high blood pressure. Forbes reported that 40% of the clinical trial participants for Vylessi experienced nausea with 13% having to take anti-nausea medications because it was so severe.

I know what you're thinking, - 'Don't women have an option where they're not pricked by a needle or compelled to stay abstinent from their favourite drink?' We're still in the preliminary stages of a female viagra so it might be a while till we can create a convenient chemical fix for low libido in women. As mentioned earlier, women's sexual desire is complicated, and some experts aren't even sure that a pill is really the cure for women's declining sex mojo.

Benefits of female viagra

The two available choices that we have as 'female viagra' show modest benefits but they're nowhere near the success rate of Viagra. But it should be noted that both the drugs are treating different conditions; Viagra is treating Erectile dysfunction (ED) which is a relatively straightforward mechanical issue concerning the penis. Men with ED don't necessarily have a lack of interest in sex, they just can't seem to show it through an erection.

However, for women, it’s a broader condition as women's sexuality has complexities we still can’t quite comprehend. It's not as simple as increasing blood flow to the vagina or clitoris but based on a myriad of factors such as brain chemistry, mood, relationships, medications and health statuses.

A sexologist and behavioural scientist, Dr Frances Quirk tells ABC about the socio-cultural benefits that the introduction of such a drug will lead to. She says it may not be the answer to women's prayers for higher arousal but she still views it as a 'game-changer' that will trigger conversations about female sexuality and more women would come forward and consult doctors for problems in their sex life.

"Women's concerns about sexual wellbeing", she says, " are dismissed or not taken seriously. They'll often be told, 'oh well, it's just your age' you know, that sort of thing. Women's sexuality is devalued."

She compares the available treatments for low libido between women and men, "We've had nearly 20 years where men could present to their doctor with a sexual health problem and there was something that could be offered to them."

It's evident that female sexuality is underresearched, in fact, Addyi wasn't even supposed to be a sexual arousal pill, it was an antidepressant that had a side-effect resulting in arousal. If female sexuality appears like an unsolvable puzzle, that’s only because such few researchers and pharmaceutical companies have put their money to give women their very own viagra. The pill could've been the answer if it had better benefits but if you have a low sex drive, according to Dr Adams, "it’s better to look at all the potential causes (psychological and physical) of why you may not have a sex drive" before choosing the pill.

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