Culture

Find Out Why Rashmit Arora Doesn't Drink!

Rashmit Arora is a musician from Navi Mumbai/ Pennsylvania who has been making music for a while now. Following the trail of his bands, the ' Sea Offs' and 'Palmlines',we traced him back here to Mumbai, preparing to play a set at the next edition of LVNG Sessions.

Rashmit Arora is a musician from Navi Mumbai/ Pennsylvania who has been making music for a while now. Following the trail of his bands, the ' Sea Offs' and 'Palmlines',we traced him back here to Mumbai, preparing to play a set at the next edition of LVNG Sessions. Here's him answering all our questions:

1 . So Rashmit, you're a part of the ‘Sea Offs' as well as 'Palmlines'. Could you tell us more about the music and the meaning behind either or both of the bands?
A : Sea Offs is a dream folk duo that my friend Olivia Price and I started back in 2015. I primarily play the role of lead guitar player and producer in the band, but I play an active role in the songwriting as well. Palmlines, on the other hand, is a post/indie rock project that my friends Brad Sorman, Otto Kuehrmann, Sebastian Goodridge, and I started in 2016. I am the lead singer and one of the guitar players in that band. Both the projects play very different types of music. Sea Offs will put you to sleep (in a good way) and Palmlines will wake you up (in a good way?). Not the best analogy. Listen to the music!

2 . Could you tell us more about the Indie scene in the States, in comparison to the scene in India?
A : I think there's a big difference in the indie music scenes in the US and India. The scene is definitely much, much larger in the US, which is both a good thing and a bad thing; the positive is that there is lots of music and art constantly being put out, but the negative is that this volume of art makes it very hard to get yourself heard. In India, I think that, if you're good, it isn't as difficult to build a following and to get people to come out to your shows.
There's a big DIY movement in the US, and of late on my visits home I've started feeling more of a presence of that in India with things like Reproduce and Lving and Sofar coming to the fore. I feel that India's scene is definitely growing, but it mainly caters to very specific genres, and it would only be able to sustain artists that play certain styles of music. I'm hoping it grows to a point where there is more acceptability for alternative styles of music.

 

3 . Tell us more about your solo initiative. What inspires the music?
A. : My solo project's sound is yet to be defined. The music is reminiscent of artists such as Damien Rice, Gregory Alan Isakov, and Alexi Murdoch, all of which were early and prominent influences on my music. The reason I say my sound is undefined is because I'm yet to release anything 'officially' under my name. I think an artist's sound is defined once there is some sort of concrete media associated with the artist. My goal this summer is to start recording that very piece of media (probably an EP). The songs that will likely be on it are inspired by a longing to belong, which is something you tend to experience a lot when you live so far away from the place you call home.

4 . On a scale of 1-10, how much do you enjoy drinking? And what's your favourite kind of alcohol?
A :  Alcohol? Ew. -1. Never. Paap lagega. (my parents will find a way to this article no matter how much I try to hide it)

5 . Are you a foodie? Tell us about your favourite kinds of food!
A : I'm a researcher in food economics at Penn State, so I'm definitely a foodie, just of the plant-based variety. I love me some dosa. It's what I yearn for the most while I'm in the US. That and chole bhature.. baap re. The mouth waters.

You can find some for Rashmit's work down here.
https://soundcloud.com/rashmitarora

Don't forget to show up at LVNG session #5 to catch him perform on the 1st of June, 2018!

Culture

Find Out Why Rashmit Arora Doesn't Drink!

Rashmit Arora is a musician from Navi Mumbai/ Pennsylvania who has been making music for a while now. Following the trail of his bands, the ' Sea Offs' and 'Palmlines',we traced him back here to Mumbai, preparing to play a set at the next edition of LVNG Sessions.

Rashmit Arora is a musician from Navi Mumbai/ Pennsylvania who has been making music for a while now. Following the trail of his bands, the ' Sea Offs' and 'Palmlines',we traced him back here to Mumbai, preparing to play a set at the next edition of LVNG Sessions. Here's him answering all our questions:

1 . So Rashmit, you're a part of the ‘Sea Offs' as well as 'Palmlines'. Could you tell us more about the music and the meaning behind either or both of the bands?
A : Sea Offs is a dream folk duo that my friend Olivia Price and I started back in 2015. I primarily play the role of lead guitar player and producer in the band, but I play an active role in the songwriting as well. Palmlines, on the other hand, is a post/indie rock project that my friends Brad Sorman, Otto Kuehrmann, Sebastian Goodridge, and I started in 2016. I am the lead singer and one of the guitar players in that band. Both the projects play very different types of music. Sea Offs will put you to sleep (in a good way) and Palmlines will wake you up (in a good way?). Not the best analogy. Listen to the music!

2 . Could you tell us more about the Indie scene in the States, in comparison to the scene in India?
A : I think there's a big difference in the indie music scenes in the US and India. The scene is definitely much, much larger in the US, which is both a good thing and a bad thing; the positive is that there is lots of music and art constantly being put out, but the negative is that this volume of art makes it very hard to get yourself heard. In India, I think that, if you're good, it isn't as difficult to build a following and to get people to come out to your shows.
There's a big DIY movement in the US, and of late on my visits home I've started feeling more of a presence of that in India with things like Reproduce and Lving and Sofar coming to the fore. I feel that India's scene is definitely growing, but it mainly caters to very specific genres, and it would only be able to sustain artists that play certain styles of music. I'm hoping it grows to a point where there is more acceptability for alternative styles of music.

 

3 . Tell us more about your solo initiative. What inspires the music?
A. : My solo project's sound is yet to be defined. The music is reminiscent of artists such as Damien Rice, Gregory Alan Isakov, and Alexi Murdoch, all of which were early and prominent influences on my music. The reason I say my sound is undefined is because I'm yet to release anything 'officially' under my name. I think an artist's sound is defined once there is some sort of concrete media associated with the artist. My goal this summer is to start recording that very piece of media (probably an EP). The songs that will likely be on it are inspired by a longing to belong, which is something you tend to experience a lot when you live so far away from the place you call home.

4 . On a scale of 1-10, how much do you enjoy drinking? And what's your favourite kind of alcohol?
A :  Alcohol? Ew. -1. Never. Paap lagega. (my parents will find a way to this article no matter how much I try to hide it)

5 . Are you a foodie? Tell us about your favourite kinds of food!
A : I'm a researcher in food economics at Penn State, so I'm definitely a foodie, just of the plant-based variety. I love me some dosa. It's what I yearn for the most while I'm in the US. That and chole bhature.. baap re. The mouth waters.

You can find some for Rashmit's work down here.
https://soundcloud.com/rashmitarora

Don't forget to show up at LVNG session #5 to catch him perform on the 1st of June, 2018!

Culture

Find Out Why Rashmit Arora Doesn't Drink!

Rashmit Arora is a musician from Navi Mumbai/ Pennsylvania who has been making music for a while now. Following the trail of his bands, the ' Sea Offs' and 'Palmlines',we traced him back here to Mumbai, preparing to play a set at the next edition of LVNG Sessions.

Rashmit Arora is a musician from Navi Mumbai/ Pennsylvania who has been making music for a while now. Following the trail of his bands, the ' Sea Offs' and 'Palmlines',we traced him back here to Mumbai, preparing to play a set at the next edition of LVNG Sessions. Here's him answering all our questions:

1 . So Rashmit, you're a part of the ‘Sea Offs' as well as 'Palmlines'. Could you tell us more about the music and the meaning behind either or both of the bands?
A : Sea Offs is a dream folk duo that my friend Olivia Price and I started back in 2015. I primarily play the role of lead guitar player and producer in the band, but I play an active role in the songwriting as well. Palmlines, on the other hand, is a post/indie rock project that my friends Brad Sorman, Otto Kuehrmann, Sebastian Goodridge, and I started in 2016. I am the lead singer and one of the guitar players in that band. Both the projects play very different types of music. Sea Offs will put you to sleep (in a good way) and Palmlines will wake you up (in a good way?). Not the best analogy. Listen to the music!

2 . Could you tell us more about the Indie scene in the States, in comparison to the scene in India?
A : I think there's a big difference in the indie music scenes in the US and India. The scene is definitely much, much larger in the US, which is both a good thing and a bad thing; the positive is that there is lots of music and art constantly being put out, but the negative is that this volume of art makes it very hard to get yourself heard. In India, I think that, if you're good, it isn't as difficult to build a following and to get people to come out to your shows.
There's a big DIY movement in the US, and of late on my visits home I've started feeling more of a presence of that in India with things like Reproduce and Lving and Sofar coming to the fore. I feel that India's scene is definitely growing, but it mainly caters to very specific genres, and it would only be able to sustain artists that play certain styles of music. I'm hoping it grows to a point where there is more acceptability for alternative styles of music.

 

3 . Tell us more about your solo initiative. What inspires the music?
A. : My solo project's sound is yet to be defined. The music is reminiscent of artists such as Damien Rice, Gregory Alan Isakov, and Alexi Murdoch, all of which were early and prominent influences on my music. The reason I say my sound is undefined is because I'm yet to release anything 'officially' under my name. I think an artist's sound is defined once there is some sort of concrete media associated with the artist. My goal this summer is to start recording that very piece of media (probably an EP). The songs that will likely be on it are inspired by a longing to belong, which is something you tend to experience a lot when you live so far away from the place you call home.

4 . On a scale of 1-10, how much do you enjoy drinking? And what's your favourite kind of alcohol?
A :  Alcohol? Ew. -1. Never. Paap lagega. (my parents will find a way to this article no matter how much I try to hide it)

5 . Are you a foodie? Tell us about your favourite kinds of food!
A : I'm a researcher in food economics at Penn State, so I'm definitely a foodie, just of the plant-based variety. I love me some dosa. It's what I yearn for the most while I'm in the US. That and chole bhature.. baap re. The mouth waters.

You can find some for Rashmit's work down here.
https://soundcloud.com/rashmitarora

Don't forget to show up at LVNG session #5 to catch him perform on the 1st of June, 2018!

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Good News : August 31st

We’ve found the stuff that’ll make you smile, so, here’s your weekly dose of positive, wholesome, non-negative, not-for-profit, legitimate headlines… Well, you get the point.