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Eats

Global Warming ? Veggies

Anyone not living under a rock has realized that it’s actually getting hotter by the day.

Anyone not living under a rock has realized that it’s actually getting hotter by the day. There are also some world leaders completely denying that this rising level of heat, aka global warming, is being caused by us. But the matter is not a joke anymore, as it may seriously affect our food.

A study led by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) examined the extent to which projected changes such as increases in temperature and reduced water availability could affect the production and nutritional quality of common crops such as tomatoes, leafy vegetables and pulses.

If no action is taken, the researchers say that by mid to the end of the century, water availability and ozone concentrations would reduce average yields of vegetables and legumes by 35% and 9% respectively. In South Asia, the rate of vegetable production is expected to reduce by 31%.

Environmental damage is estimated to become more drastic and irreversible in the 21st century. If nothing is done soon, a majority of the planet’s population will have to rely on another source of nutrition, as vegetables will become obsolete for a majority of the global population.

Eats

Global Warming ? Veggies

Anyone not living under a rock has realized that it’s actually getting hotter by the day.

Anyone not living under a rock has realized that it’s actually getting hotter by the day. There are also some world leaders completely denying that this rising level of heat, aka global warming, is being caused by us. But the matter is not a joke anymore, as it may seriously affect our food.

A study led by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) examined the extent to which projected changes such as increases in temperature and reduced water availability could affect the production and nutritional quality of common crops such as tomatoes, leafy vegetables and pulses.

If no action is taken, the researchers say that by mid to the end of the century, water availability and ozone concentrations would reduce average yields of vegetables and legumes by 35% and 9% respectively. In South Asia, the rate of vegetable production is expected to reduce by 31%.

Environmental damage is estimated to become more drastic and irreversible in the 21st century. If nothing is done soon, a majority of the planet’s population will have to rely on another source of nutrition, as vegetables will become obsolete for a majority of the global population.

Eats

Global Warming ? Veggies

Anyone not living under a rock has realized that it’s actually getting hotter by the day.

Anyone not living under a rock has realized that it’s actually getting hotter by the day. There are also some world leaders completely denying that this rising level of heat, aka global warming, is being caused by us. But the matter is not a joke anymore, as it may seriously affect our food.

A study led by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) examined the extent to which projected changes such as increases in temperature and reduced water availability could affect the production and nutritional quality of common crops such as tomatoes, leafy vegetables and pulses.

If no action is taken, the researchers say that by mid to the end of the century, water availability and ozone concentrations would reduce average yields of vegetables and legumes by 35% and 9% respectively. In South Asia, the rate of vegetable production is expected to reduce by 31%.

Environmental damage is estimated to become more drastic and irreversible in the 21st century. If nothing is done soon, a majority of the planet’s population will have to rely on another source of nutrition, as vegetables will become obsolete for a majority of the global population.

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