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Culture

Hackers Are Disrupting Zoom Classes With Porn!

With the surge in online classes at schools, businesses have thrown open the gates for computer hackers to intrude and disrupt classes and calls.

After a porn clip started playing in the middle of an online class on Zoom, a school in Chandigarh Capital Region (CCR) has asked its students’ parents to be present for all online classes.
After 45 students had joined the session, the teacher locked the conference room and stepped out to do a final audio and video test on her son’s computer. While she was gone, a porn clip began playing on the screen from a student’s screen. It took almost five minutes for the teacher to realize what was happening and rush back to end the session.


But the student denied that she was responsible for the incident, stating that her father was in the room with her when the incident happened.


With the surge in online classes at schools, businesses have thrown open the gates for computer hackers to intrude and disrupt classes and calls. On Zoom, the problem seems to be a lot more persistent -  it’s called Zoom bombing, an unfortunate growing trend in the age of a pandemic.
That is exactly what happened in the case of the online class in Chandigarh.


As India goes through the second phase of its lockdown, many schools and colleges have turned to free apps such as Zoom, Google Duo, and Google Classroom which are facing a large number of security issues—to complete their syllabus. The situation is so bad, the FBI is warning people about intruders on Zoom calls with pornographic or hate images.


While the Zoom app has skyrocketed in popularity due to the lockdown in many countries, the home ministry in India has asked government officers not to use it for “official purposes”, stating that it is “not a safe platform”.  


“Here, we are trying to run a formal and structured class in a public place. The difference is the same as it is for teaching children in schools inside a gated community and in open parks. In public areas, anyone can come and join the class and sit next to your child, click his photograph, and can even use his name to introduce himself,” Naunihal Singh, IGP, Cyber Crime, Punjab Police told The Huffington Post.


Considering the fact that the CBSE, in particular, has also not given any guidelines as to how the rest of the syllabus and exams will be handled - a lot of teachers are lost. They are using these platforms and trying to finish off the syllabus and other tests.  While CBSE has recommended online coaching to its affiliated schools, it has not specified the medium. Which is why these free apps like Zoom are being used.


 “We have recommended online coaching to our affiliated schools during the  COVID 19 lockdown but have not recommended the medium as they cannot afford it,” said Dr. Joseph Emmanuel, director (academics), CBSE, told The Huffington Post, adding that schools should use online resources such as YouTube videos and WhatsApp groups to interact with students. 


Zoom founder and CEO Eric Yuan said his company wasn't prepared for the influx of novice users in an interview."I think this is a mistake and lesson learned," he said. He said businesses using Zoom typically have IT departments that require employees to use passwords and enable additional security features, something first-time users often don't do.


“Usage of Zoom has ballooned overnight,” Eric Yuan said in a blog post, in ways he could not have foreseen before the coronavirus pandemic. At the end of December, the maximum number of daily Zoom meeting participants was roughly 10 million, Yuan said. In March, Zoom reached more than 200 million.


As of now, there seems to be no way to control the situation but the company promises that it's looking into the issue and trying its best to fix it. However, for India - using the app may become a little difficult since these incidents are quite common and perhaps too surprising to manage.

Culture

Hackers Are Disrupting Zoom Classes With Porn!

With the surge in online classes at schools, businesses have thrown open the gates for computer hackers to intrude and disrupt classes and calls.

After a porn clip started playing in the middle of an online class on Zoom, a school in Chandigarh Capital Region (CCR) has asked its students’ parents to be present for all online classes.
After 45 students had joined the session, the teacher locked the conference room and stepped out to do a final audio and video test on her son’s computer. While she was gone, a porn clip began playing on the screen from a student’s screen. It took almost five minutes for the teacher to realize what was happening and rush back to end the session.


But the student denied that she was responsible for the incident, stating that her father was in the room with her when the incident happened.


With the surge in online classes at schools, businesses have thrown open the gates for computer hackers to intrude and disrupt classes and calls. On Zoom, the problem seems to be a lot more persistent -  it’s called Zoom bombing, an unfortunate growing trend in the age of a pandemic.
That is exactly what happened in the case of the online class in Chandigarh.


As India goes through the second phase of its lockdown, many schools and colleges have turned to free apps such as Zoom, Google Duo, and Google Classroom which are facing a large number of security issues—to complete their syllabus. The situation is so bad, the FBI is warning people about intruders on Zoom calls with pornographic or hate images.


While the Zoom app has skyrocketed in popularity due to the lockdown in many countries, the home ministry in India has asked government officers not to use it for “official purposes”, stating that it is “not a safe platform”.  


“Here, we are trying to run a formal and structured class in a public place. The difference is the same as it is for teaching children in schools inside a gated community and in open parks. In public areas, anyone can come and join the class and sit next to your child, click his photograph, and can even use his name to introduce himself,” Naunihal Singh, IGP, Cyber Crime, Punjab Police told The Huffington Post.


Considering the fact that the CBSE, in particular, has also not given any guidelines as to how the rest of the syllabus and exams will be handled - a lot of teachers are lost. They are using these platforms and trying to finish off the syllabus and other tests.  While CBSE has recommended online coaching to its affiliated schools, it has not specified the medium. Which is why these free apps like Zoom are being used.


 “We have recommended online coaching to our affiliated schools during the  COVID 19 lockdown but have not recommended the medium as they cannot afford it,” said Dr. Joseph Emmanuel, director (academics), CBSE, told The Huffington Post, adding that schools should use online resources such as YouTube videos and WhatsApp groups to interact with students. 


Zoom founder and CEO Eric Yuan said his company wasn't prepared for the influx of novice users in an interview."I think this is a mistake and lesson learned," he said. He said businesses using Zoom typically have IT departments that require employees to use passwords and enable additional security features, something first-time users often don't do.


“Usage of Zoom has ballooned overnight,” Eric Yuan said in a blog post, in ways he could not have foreseen before the coronavirus pandemic. At the end of December, the maximum number of daily Zoom meeting participants was roughly 10 million, Yuan said. In March, Zoom reached more than 200 million.


As of now, there seems to be no way to control the situation but the company promises that it's looking into the issue and trying its best to fix it. However, for India - using the app may become a little difficult since these incidents are quite common and perhaps too surprising to manage.

Culture

Hackers Are Disrupting Zoom Classes With Porn!

With the surge in online classes at schools, businesses have thrown open the gates for computer hackers to intrude and disrupt classes and calls.

After a porn clip started playing in the middle of an online class on Zoom, a school in Chandigarh Capital Region (CCR) has asked its students’ parents to be present for all online classes.
After 45 students had joined the session, the teacher locked the conference room and stepped out to do a final audio and video test on her son’s computer. While she was gone, a porn clip began playing on the screen from a student’s screen. It took almost five minutes for the teacher to realize what was happening and rush back to end the session.


But the student denied that she was responsible for the incident, stating that her father was in the room with her when the incident happened.


With the surge in online classes at schools, businesses have thrown open the gates for computer hackers to intrude and disrupt classes and calls. On Zoom, the problem seems to be a lot more persistent -  it’s called Zoom bombing, an unfortunate growing trend in the age of a pandemic.
That is exactly what happened in the case of the online class in Chandigarh.


As India goes through the second phase of its lockdown, many schools and colleges have turned to free apps such as Zoom, Google Duo, and Google Classroom which are facing a large number of security issues—to complete their syllabus. The situation is so bad, the FBI is warning people about intruders on Zoom calls with pornographic or hate images.


While the Zoom app has skyrocketed in popularity due to the lockdown in many countries, the home ministry in India has asked government officers not to use it for “official purposes”, stating that it is “not a safe platform”.  


“Here, we are trying to run a formal and structured class in a public place. The difference is the same as it is for teaching children in schools inside a gated community and in open parks. In public areas, anyone can come and join the class and sit next to your child, click his photograph, and can even use his name to introduce himself,” Naunihal Singh, IGP, Cyber Crime, Punjab Police told The Huffington Post.


Considering the fact that the CBSE, in particular, has also not given any guidelines as to how the rest of the syllabus and exams will be handled - a lot of teachers are lost. They are using these platforms and trying to finish off the syllabus and other tests.  While CBSE has recommended online coaching to its affiliated schools, it has not specified the medium. Which is why these free apps like Zoom are being used.


 “We have recommended online coaching to our affiliated schools during the  COVID 19 lockdown but have not recommended the medium as they cannot afford it,” said Dr. Joseph Emmanuel, director (academics), CBSE, told The Huffington Post, adding that schools should use online resources such as YouTube videos and WhatsApp groups to interact with students. 


Zoom founder and CEO Eric Yuan said his company wasn't prepared for the influx of novice users in an interview."I think this is a mistake and lesson learned," he said. He said businesses using Zoom typically have IT departments that require employees to use passwords and enable additional security features, something first-time users often don't do.


“Usage of Zoom has ballooned overnight,” Eric Yuan said in a blog post, in ways he could not have foreseen before the coronavirus pandemic. At the end of December, the maximum number of daily Zoom meeting participants was roughly 10 million, Yuan said. In March, Zoom reached more than 200 million.


As of now, there seems to be no way to control the situation but the company promises that it's looking into the issue and trying its best to fix it. However, for India - using the app may become a little difficult since these incidents are quite common and perhaps too surprising to manage.

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