Trends

Here Is How Mumbai Is Getting Affected By Climate Change Due To Loss Of Mangrove & Tree Cover

Projects like bullet train and coastal road are most likely to damage Mumbai in the long run

Recently, India's first high-speed rail line between Ahmedabad and Mumbai is one of the most ambitious project of the Modi government. As the work of land acquisition for the project gains momentum, reports by the Maharashtra state government have revealed that at least 54,000 mangroves will be cut for the purpose.

Activists have been protesting throughout the city after government made decisions to chop off trees for the Metro railway connection. Things are predicted to get worse when the coastal road and bullet train construction as well will take over and the mangrove cover that the city has will diminish.

The mangroves essentially protect the city against high tides. Mumbai being an island city, mangroves play a rather important role in maintaining ecological balance in the city. The properties of mangrove not only absorb major impact from the sea, but also help in regulating temperatures just like other tree cover that lies under threat in the Aarey colony.

The temperatures have already been soaring in Mumbai due to the cover of trees diminishing over years. The second hottest day was recorded in March 2019 this decade, getting within a touching distance of 41.3 degrees C recorded on March 17, 2011.

The highest ever temperature recorded this month in Mumbai was on March 28, 1956 when the mercury reached 41.7 degrees. Mumbai is most definitely getting hotter each year and there is not much that seems will change over time.

Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment released a study-- India warming analysis-- to understand how India's temperature graph has changed in the last 116 years (from 1901 to 2017). The study, first-of-its-kind, clearly showcased that the country's temperature has considerably increased, making it much hotter than a century ago.

According to the study, the annual mean temperature in India has increased by 1.2 degrees Celsius since the beginning of the 20th century. In fact, 2016 was the second warmest year on record with temperature of 1.26 degrees Celsius higher than its previous years. Moreover, the winter of January-February in 2017 was hottest in recorded history with temperature of 2.95 degrees Celsius higher than the baseline.

Not just this but the city seems to be having the worst experience with rains too. Granted, that it is geographically an island, and yet the waterlogging and flooding is not just hazardous but proving to be fatal for the city. As India itself goes through climate change, Mumbai as one of its leading metro cities suffers more and more as the condition of nature here keeps deteriorating.

Trends

Here Is How Mumbai Is Getting Affected By Climate Change Due To Loss Of Mangrove & Tree Cover

Projects like bullet train and coastal road are most likely to damage Mumbai in the long run

Recently, India's first high-speed rail line between Ahmedabad and Mumbai is one of the most ambitious project of the Modi government. As the work of land acquisition for the project gains momentum, reports by the Maharashtra state government have revealed that at least 54,000 mangroves will be cut for the purpose.

Activists have been protesting throughout the city after government made decisions to chop off trees for the Metro railway connection. Things are predicted to get worse when the coastal road and bullet train construction as well will take over and the mangrove cover that the city has will diminish.

The mangroves essentially protect the city against high tides. Mumbai being an island city, mangroves play a rather important role in maintaining ecological balance in the city. The properties of mangrove not only absorb major impact from the sea, but also help in regulating temperatures just like other tree cover that lies under threat in the Aarey colony.

The temperatures have already been soaring in Mumbai due to the cover of trees diminishing over years. The second hottest day was recorded in March 2019 this decade, getting within a touching distance of 41.3 degrees C recorded on March 17, 2011.

The highest ever temperature recorded this month in Mumbai was on March 28, 1956 when the mercury reached 41.7 degrees. Mumbai is most definitely getting hotter each year and there is not much that seems will change over time.

Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment released a study-- India warming analysis-- to understand how India's temperature graph has changed in the last 116 years (from 1901 to 2017). The study, first-of-its-kind, clearly showcased that the country's temperature has considerably increased, making it much hotter than a century ago.

According to the study, the annual mean temperature in India has increased by 1.2 degrees Celsius since the beginning of the 20th century. In fact, 2016 was the second warmest year on record with temperature of 1.26 degrees Celsius higher than its previous years. Moreover, the winter of January-February in 2017 was hottest in recorded history with temperature of 2.95 degrees Celsius higher than the baseline.

Not just this but the city seems to be having the worst experience with rains too. Granted, that it is geographically an island, and yet the waterlogging and flooding is not just hazardous but proving to be fatal for the city. As India itself goes through climate change, Mumbai as one of its leading metro cities suffers more and more as the condition of nature here keeps deteriorating.

Trends

Here Is How Mumbai Is Getting Affected By Climate Change Due To Loss Of Mangrove & Tree Cover

Projects like bullet train and coastal road are most likely to damage Mumbai in the long run

Recently, India's first high-speed rail line between Ahmedabad and Mumbai is one of the most ambitious project of the Modi government. As the work of land acquisition for the project gains momentum, reports by the Maharashtra state government have revealed that at least 54,000 mangroves will be cut for the purpose.

Activists have been protesting throughout the city after government made decisions to chop off trees for the Metro railway connection. Things are predicted to get worse when the coastal road and bullet train construction as well will take over and the mangrove cover that the city has will diminish.

The mangroves essentially protect the city against high tides. Mumbai being an island city, mangroves play a rather important role in maintaining ecological balance in the city. The properties of mangrove not only absorb major impact from the sea, but also help in regulating temperatures just like other tree cover that lies under threat in the Aarey colony.

The temperatures have already been soaring in Mumbai due to the cover of trees diminishing over years. The second hottest day was recorded in March 2019 this decade, getting within a touching distance of 41.3 degrees C recorded on March 17, 2011.

The highest ever temperature recorded this month in Mumbai was on March 28, 1956 when the mercury reached 41.7 degrees. Mumbai is most definitely getting hotter each year and there is not much that seems will change over time.

Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment released a study-- India warming analysis-- to understand how India's temperature graph has changed in the last 116 years (from 1901 to 2017). The study, first-of-its-kind, clearly showcased that the country's temperature has considerably increased, making it much hotter than a century ago.

According to the study, the annual mean temperature in India has increased by 1.2 degrees Celsius since the beginning of the 20th century. In fact, 2016 was the second warmest year on record with temperature of 1.26 degrees Celsius higher than its previous years. Moreover, the winter of January-February in 2017 was hottest in recorded history with temperature of 2.95 degrees Celsius higher than the baseline.

Not just this but the city seems to be having the worst experience with rains too. Granted, that it is geographically an island, and yet the waterlogging and flooding is not just hazardous but proving to be fatal for the city. As India itself goes through climate change, Mumbai as one of its leading metro cities suffers more and more as the condition of nature here keeps deteriorating.

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