Trends

Here's How Sex Feels On Different Drugs, In Case You're Wondering

It's important that you have some information on what you're getting into before you jump into the sack or a bathroom stall with a bag full of drugs.

Disclaimer: BingeDaily does not support drug use and/or drug abuse. 


It's important that you have some information on what you're getting into before you jump into the sack or a bathroom stall with a bag full of something. We've scrapped through every bit of information available on the internet - experiences, drug forums and researches - to compile this list for you.

Here's what you need to know before you lose yourself entirely:

Alcohol

Alcohol is one of the most commonly used substance to initiate sex and luckily there's a whole lot of studies on the how it affects your sex life.

A tipsy buzz can make it easier to talk about desires freely and openly, or help someone feeling pain due to stress and tension to loosen up and find pleasure. For most people, that's the effect of a few drinks over the course of an evening. Consume more than that, and you can start running into trouble.

Alcohol, especially when consumed in large quantities, dampens not just your inhibitions, but also your long-term decision-making processes, drastically increasing your chance of having unprotected sex. Its impacts on your brain, nervous system, and body can cause erectile dysfunction in men and dulled sensations and delayed, difficult orgasms for men and women. (Some couples actually like this, since it helps them deal with premature busting or similar issues.) The dehydration caused by booze can also make it difficult for a woman to get wet as well, which can turn the other way and make sex more painful.

Weed

Second to alcohol, weed is also one of the most common drugs used to engage in sex, and a whole lot of people can testify that it's probably the best sex they've ever had. Some people describe weed as an aphrodisiac, making them harder, wetter, and more sensitive, or a relaxant, loosening things up .

Others call it a downer that suppresses their interest in sex. Despite varied tales, studies on cannabis and copulation suggest that the majority of users experience positive effects when on pot. Weed increases sensations, which can augment or dampen sex drives, depending on our mental states and environments while smoking up.

Although weed does alter the mind, it doesn't seem to increase risky sexual behaviors like alcohol or amphetamines. And considering that weed is available around the country, for many users it probably offers the best balance of safety and reliability on this list.

MDMA or Molly

Going off of the dozen or so stories of MDMA-fueled casual sex in the in the CSP database, you might think molly, a unique drug that shares qualities with amphetamines and hallucinogens, was just another sense-enhancing stimulant aphrodisiac.

Some studies, half of the users researchers talked to said they'd experienced an increased sex drive, reinforcing the drug's stimulant connections. But that doesn't actually make much sense given the pharmacological properties of MDMA.

Pure MDMA produces euphoria and feelings of empathy in most people, and a number of individuals who use pure MDMA experience feelings of emotional closeness (even with strangers), which can include sensuality, although without the desire for penetrative sex.

Some people still try to use pure MDMA's empathetic qualities to enhance sex. But more often than not, the drug's sexual impairments, from drive decrease to erectile dysfunction, win out.

Amphetamines

Steven Shoptaw, a UCLA professor and psychologist of substance abuse, some amphetamines are used across demographic lines as well, which is unusual for most drugs. He tells of bikers, sure, but also housewives, eager to keep up their sexual appetites despite their chores and childcare duties.

There's a large diversity in opinions, but the science of stimulants suggests that a vast majority of people popping, snorting, or injecting amphetamines will experience sex heightening highs. There are some differences within the substance though, coke's effects generally fade within an hour, while meth's can last as long as 11 or 12 hours. But they generally make you feel like a sex god—everything seems amazing and you can have sex longer than usual.

But by encouraging rough or marathon sex, they can lead people to push their bodies unto bleeding and chafing. Coupled with a lack of sleep and a decreased assessment of risk, the amphetamine drive to get any sex as quickly as possible makes coke-, meth- or pill-sex a gateway to contract a disease.

Hallucinogens

Psychedelics and dissociatives (covering everything from DMT to LSD to ketamine to PCP) are among the most subjective and unreliable drugs on the market. Some describe them as creating a primal, almost amphetamine-like lust. Others describe them as being more like pure, cuddle-inducing molly.

But within hallucinogens also, each type hits differently - LSD hits wide, making it especially unpredictable. DMT hits hard, so you'll most likely be far too passed out to have sex. And PCP and ketamine hit our deep brain, making them destructive and risky— they can stop your breathing, for instance. But for all their little variations, they all touch a few of the same spots to loosen up our thought patterns.

Depending on who you are, where you are, and what state of mind you're in, you're going to have very different hallucinogenic sex experiences. It's all entirely based on your body and mind, the amount of research on this is a letdown, you're on your own for this one.

Opiates

Heroin and a number of painkillers and sedatives are perhaps the least sexy category on here. That makes some sense, considering opioids are fueling a large increase in overdose deaths.

Opiates are among the least-studied narcotics when it comes to sex because their use in intercourse is so rare as to be a negligible population-wide phenomenon.

Opiates apparently bind to bits of your brain in such a way that they inhibit the production of neurochemicals associated with sexy feelings. That goes for anything from codeine to heroin—some opiates are more addictive than others, and some are better controlled in medicinal doses.

That said, you can find a tiny minority of people who claim to enjoy sex on opiates, either because a mild dose can give them an altered sense of time, elongating sexual experiences (especially for people dealing with premature ejaculation), or because it can increase relaxation and comfort, or just because it can make you feel a little bit loopy, but still awake.

Taking drugs can be pretty risky and is often a shot in the dark when it comes to having enjoyable sex, especially when you're getting your drugs off the black market or from shady guys on the street. Even if you've tried a particular drug before, adding sex into the equation is a new layer of experimental factor to account for, so be careful. Or you could just have sober sex, which is risky enough in its own right in this day and age, considering all the STDS and ghosting that may follow.

Trends

Here's How Sex Feels On Different Drugs, In Case You're Wondering

It's important that you have some information on what you're getting into before you jump into the sack or a bathroom stall with a bag full of drugs.

Disclaimer: BingeDaily does not support drug use and/or drug abuse. 


It's important that you have some information on what you're getting into before you jump into the sack or a bathroom stall with a bag full of something. We've scrapped through every bit of information available on the internet - experiences, drug forums and researches - to compile this list for you.

Here's what you need to know before you lose yourself entirely:

Alcohol

Alcohol is one of the most commonly used substance to initiate sex and luckily there's a whole lot of studies on the how it affects your sex life.

A tipsy buzz can make it easier to talk about desires freely and openly, or help someone feeling pain due to stress and tension to loosen up and find pleasure. For most people, that's the effect of a few drinks over the course of an evening. Consume more than that, and you can start running into trouble.

Alcohol, especially when consumed in large quantities, dampens not just your inhibitions, but also your long-term decision-making processes, drastically increasing your chance of having unprotected sex. Its impacts on your brain, nervous system, and body can cause erectile dysfunction in men and dulled sensations and delayed, difficult orgasms for men and women. (Some couples actually like this, since it helps them deal with premature busting or similar issues.) The dehydration caused by booze can also make it difficult for a woman to get wet as well, which can turn the other way and make sex more painful.

Weed

Second to alcohol, weed is also one of the most common drugs used to engage in sex, and a whole lot of people can testify that it's probably the best sex they've ever had. Some people describe weed as an aphrodisiac, making them harder, wetter, and more sensitive, or a relaxant, loosening things up .

Others call it a downer that suppresses their interest in sex. Despite varied tales, studies on cannabis and copulation suggest that the majority of users experience positive effects when on pot. Weed increases sensations, which can augment or dampen sex drives, depending on our mental states and environments while smoking up.

Although weed does alter the mind, it doesn't seem to increase risky sexual behaviors like alcohol or amphetamines. And considering that weed is available around the country, for many users it probably offers the best balance of safety and reliability on this list.

MDMA or Molly

Going off of the dozen or so stories of MDMA-fueled casual sex in the in the CSP database, you might think molly, a unique drug that shares qualities with amphetamines and hallucinogens, was just another sense-enhancing stimulant aphrodisiac.

Some studies, half of the users researchers talked to said they'd experienced an increased sex drive, reinforcing the drug's stimulant connections. But that doesn't actually make much sense given the pharmacological properties of MDMA.

Pure MDMA produces euphoria and feelings of empathy in most people, and a number of individuals who use pure MDMA experience feelings of emotional closeness (even with strangers), which can include sensuality, although without the desire for penetrative sex.

Some people still try to use pure MDMA's empathetic qualities to enhance sex. But more often than not, the drug's sexual impairments, from drive decrease to erectile dysfunction, win out.

Amphetamines

Steven Shoptaw, a UCLA professor and psychologist of substance abuse, some amphetamines are used across demographic lines as well, which is unusual for most drugs. He tells of bikers, sure, but also housewives, eager to keep up their sexual appetites despite their chores and childcare duties.

There's a large diversity in opinions, but the science of stimulants suggests that a vast majority of people popping, snorting, or injecting amphetamines will experience sex heightening highs. There are some differences within the substance though, coke's effects generally fade within an hour, while meth's can last as long as 11 or 12 hours. But they generally make you feel like a sex god—everything seems amazing and you can have sex longer than usual.

But by encouraging rough or marathon sex, they can lead people to push their bodies unto bleeding and chafing. Coupled with a lack of sleep and a decreased assessment of risk, the amphetamine drive to get any sex as quickly as possible makes coke-, meth- or pill-sex a gateway to contract a disease.

Hallucinogens

Psychedelics and dissociatives (covering everything from DMT to LSD to ketamine to PCP) are among the most subjective and unreliable drugs on the market. Some describe them as creating a primal, almost amphetamine-like lust. Others describe them as being more like pure, cuddle-inducing molly.

But within hallucinogens also, each type hits differently - LSD hits wide, making it especially unpredictable. DMT hits hard, so you'll most likely be far too passed out to have sex. And PCP and ketamine hit our deep brain, making them destructive and risky— they can stop your breathing, for instance. But for all their little variations, they all touch a few of the same spots to loosen up our thought patterns.

Depending on who you are, where you are, and what state of mind you're in, you're going to have very different hallucinogenic sex experiences. It's all entirely based on your body and mind, the amount of research on this is a letdown, you're on your own for this one.

Opiates

Heroin and a number of painkillers and sedatives are perhaps the least sexy category on here. That makes some sense, considering opioids are fueling a large increase in overdose deaths.

Opiates are among the least-studied narcotics when it comes to sex because their use in intercourse is so rare as to be a negligible population-wide phenomenon.

Opiates apparently bind to bits of your brain in such a way that they inhibit the production of neurochemicals associated with sexy feelings. That goes for anything from codeine to heroin—some opiates are more addictive than others, and some are better controlled in medicinal doses.

That said, you can find a tiny minority of people who claim to enjoy sex on opiates, either because a mild dose can give them an altered sense of time, elongating sexual experiences (especially for people dealing with premature ejaculation), or because it can increase relaxation and comfort, or just because it can make you feel a little bit loopy, but still awake.

Taking drugs can be pretty risky and is often a shot in the dark when it comes to having enjoyable sex, especially when you're getting your drugs off the black market or from shady guys on the street. Even if you've tried a particular drug before, adding sex into the equation is a new layer of experimental factor to account for, so be careful. Or you could just have sober sex, which is risky enough in its own right in this day and age, considering all the STDS and ghosting that may follow.

Trends

Here's How Sex Feels On Different Drugs, In Case You're Wondering

It's important that you have some information on what you're getting into before you jump into the sack or a bathroom stall with a bag full of drugs.

Disclaimer: BingeDaily does not support drug use and/or drug abuse. 


It's important that you have some information on what you're getting into before you jump into the sack or a bathroom stall with a bag full of something. We've scrapped through every bit of information available on the internet - experiences, drug forums and researches - to compile this list for you.

Here's what you need to know before you lose yourself entirely:

Alcohol

Alcohol is one of the most commonly used substance to initiate sex and luckily there's a whole lot of studies on the how it affects your sex life.

A tipsy buzz can make it easier to talk about desires freely and openly, or help someone feeling pain due to stress and tension to loosen up and find pleasure. For most people, that's the effect of a few drinks over the course of an evening. Consume more than that, and you can start running into trouble.

Alcohol, especially when consumed in large quantities, dampens not just your inhibitions, but also your long-term decision-making processes, drastically increasing your chance of having unprotected sex. Its impacts on your brain, nervous system, and body can cause erectile dysfunction in men and dulled sensations and delayed, difficult orgasms for men and women. (Some couples actually like this, since it helps them deal with premature busting or similar issues.) The dehydration caused by booze can also make it difficult for a woman to get wet as well, which can turn the other way and make sex more painful.

Weed

Second to alcohol, weed is also one of the most common drugs used to engage in sex, and a whole lot of people can testify that it's probably the best sex they've ever had. Some people describe weed as an aphrodisiac, making them harder, wetter, and more sensitive, or a relaxant, loosening things up .

Others call it a downer that suppresses their interest in sex. Despite varied tales, studies on cannabis and copulation suggest that the majority of users experience positive effects when on pot. Weed increases sensations, which can augment or dampen sex drives, depending on our mental states and environments while smoking up.

Although weed does alter the mind, it doesn't seem to increase risky sexual behaviors like alcohol or amphetamines. And considering that weed is available around the country, for many users it probably offers the best balance of safety and reliability on this list.

MDMA or Molly

Going off of the dozen or so stories of MDMA-fueled casual sex in the in the CSP database, you might think molly, a unique drug that shares qualities with amphetamines and hallucinogens, was just another sense-enhancing stimulant aphrodisiac.

Some studies, half of the users researchers talked to said they'd experienced an increased sex drive, reinforcing the drug's stimulant connections. But that doesn't actually make much sense given the pharmacological properties of MDMA.

Pure MDMA produces euphoria and feelings of empathy in most people, and a number of individuals who use pure MDMA experience feelings of emotional closeness (even with strangers), which can include sensuality, although without the desire for penetrative sex.

Some people still try to use pure MDMA's empathetic qualities to enhance sex. But more often than not, the drug's sexual impairments, from drive decrease to erectile dysfunction, win out.

Amphetamines

Steven Shoptaw, a UCLA professor and psychologist of substance abuse, some amphetamines are used across demographic lines as well, which is unusual for most drugs. He tells of bikers, sure, but also housewives, eager to keep up their sexual appetites despite their chores and childcare duties.

There's a large diversity in opinions, but the science of stimulants suggests that a vast majority of people popping, snorting, or injecting amphetamines will experience sex heightening highs. There are some differences within the substance though, coke's effects generally fade within an hour, while meth's can last as long as 11 or 12 hours. But they generally make you feel like a sex god—everything seems amazing and you can have sex longer than usual.

But by encouraging rough or marathon sex, they can lead people to push their bodies unto bleeding and chafing. Coupled with a lack of sleep and a decreased assessment of risk, the amphetamine drive to get any sex as quickly as possible makes coke-, meth- or pill-sex a gateway to contract a disease.

Hallucinogens

Psychedelics and dissociatives (covering everything from DMT to LSD to ketamine to PCP) are among the most subjective and unreliable drugs on the market. Some describe them as creating a primal, almost amphetamine-like lust. Others describe them as being more like pure, cuddle-inducing molly.

But within hallucinogens also, each type hits differently - LSD hits wide, making it especially unpredictable. DMT hits hard, so you'll most likely be far too passed out to have sex. And PCP and ketamine hit our deep brain, making them destructive and risky— they can stop your breathing, for instance. But for all their little variations, they all touch a few of the same spots to loosen up our thought patterns.

Depending on who you are, where you are, and what state of mind you're in, you're going to have very different hallucinogenic sex experiences. It's all entirely based on your body and mind, the amount of research on this is a letdown, you're on your own for this one.

Opiates

Heroin and a number of painkillers and sedatives are perhaps the least sexy category on here. That makes some sense, considering opioids are fueling a large increase in overdose deaths.

Opiates are among the least-studied narcotics when it comes to sex because their use in intercourse is so rare as to be a negligible population-wide phenomenon.

Opiates apparently bind to bits of your brain in such a way that they inhibit the production of neurochemicals associated with sexy feelings. That goes for anything from codeine to heroin—some opiates are more addictive than others, and some are better controlled in medicinal doses.

That said, you can find a tiny minority of people who claim to enjoy sex on opiates, either because a mild dose can give them an altered sense of time, elongating sexual experiences (especially for people dealing with premature ejaculation), or because it can increase relaxation and comfort, or just because it can make you feel a little bit loopy, but still awake.

Taking drugs can be pretty risky and is often a shot in the dark when it comes to having enjoyable sex, especially when you're getting your drugs off the black market or from shady guys on the street. Even if you've tried a particular drug before, adding sex into the equation is a new layer of experimental factor to account for, so be careful. Or you could just have sober sex, which is risky enough in its own right in this day and age, considering all the STDS and ghosting that may follow.

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