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Culture

In The Conservatively Masculine Army, Tania Shergill Makes Waves

We've all known the army to be a rather male-dominated, testosterone-centred space. In such a community, Tania Shergill has been breaking records.

We've all known the army to be a rather male-dominated, testosterone-centred space. In fact, in several spaces such as the Indian Army or Special Forces, women are still not allowed combatant roles, even today.

In such a community, Tania Shergill has been breaking records. Earlier this month, on Army Day, Shergill turned heads as the first woman to lead all-men contingents as the Parade Adjutant. And today, she is set to become the first female parade adjutant for the Republic Day parade.

The Parade Adjutant is the person who takes responsibility for the functioning of the parade. It is an honourable position to be taken by anyone from the army.

Who is Tania Shergill?

Tania Shergill is part of the Corps of Signals, a part of the Indian Army that handles communications. She graduated from the Officer Training Academy, Chennai to be commissioned into the Army in March 2017.

Coming from an army background with a family history of serving the army, Shergill grew up with "Army tales and anecdotes" being a part of dinner table talks to morning walks. Hence, joining the armed forces came "very naturally" to her.

After guiding her contingent on the Army Day as the first Female Adjutant, Shergill felt "great pride, a feeling of accomplishment and worthiness, and pure blessing."

She'd also known while applying for the position of Parade Adjutant on Republic Day that if selected, she would be the "first woman to do that job in history."

Shergill's accomplishments in such a short period of time represent the gradual steps to gender equality that India ever-so-often stumbles upon. The stunning parade of the Republic Day, every year, is a showcase of the might and assets the military possesses.

Watching Shergill lead her contingent with pride and discipline should be a proud moment for each and every Indian.

 

Culture

In The Conservatively Masculine Army, Tania Shergill Makes Waves

We've all known the army to be a rather male-dominated, testosterone-centred space. In such a community, Tania Shergill has been breaking records.

We've all known the army to be a rather male-dominated, testosterone-centred space. In fact, in several spaces such as the Indian Army or Special Forces, women are still not allowed combatant roles, even today.

In such a community, Tania Shergill has been breaking records. Earlier this month, on Army Day, Shergill turned heads as the first woman to lead all-men contingents as the Parade Adjutant. And today, she is set to become the first female parade adjutant for the Republic Day parade.

The Parade Adjutant is the person who takes responsibility for the functioning of the parade. It is an honourable position to be taken by anyone from the army.

Who is Tania Shergill?

Tania Shergill is part of the Corps of Signals, a part of the Indian Army that handles communications. She graduated from the Officer Training Academy, Chennai to be commissioned into the Army in March 2017.

Coming from an army background with a family history of serving the army, Shergill grew up with "Army tales and anecdotes" being a part of dinner table talks to morning walks. Hence, joining the armed forces came "very naturally" to her.

After guiding her contingent on the Army Day as the first Female Adjutant, Shergill felt "great pride, a feeling of accomplishment and worthiness, and pure blessing."

She'd also known while applying for the position of Parade Adjutant on Republic Day that if selected, she would be the "first woman to do that job in history."

Shergill's accomplishments in such a short period of time represent the gradual steps to gender equality that India ever-so-often stumbles upon. The stunning parade of the Republic Day, every year, is a showcase of the might and assets the military possesses.

Watching Shergill lead her contingent with pride and discipline should be a proud moment for each and every Indian.

 

Culture

In The Conservatively Masculine Army, Tania Shergill Makes Waves

We've all known the army to be a rather male-dominated, testosterone-centred space. In such a community, Tania Shergill has been breaking records.

We've all known the army to be a rather male-dominated, testosterone-centred space. In fact, in several spaces such as the Indian Army or Special Forces, women are still not allowed combatant roles, even today.

In such a community, Tania Shergill has been breaking records. Earlier this month, on Army Day, Shergill turned heads as the first woman to lead all-men contingents as the Parade Adjutant. And today, she is set to become the first female parade adjutant for the Republic Day parade.

The Parade Adjutant is the person who takes responsibility for the functioning of the parade. It is an honourable position to be taken by anyone from the army.

Who is Tania Shergill?

Tania Shergill is part of the Corps of Signals, a part of the Indian Army that handles communications. She graduated from the Officer Training Academy, Chennai to be commissioned into the Army in March 2017.

Coming from an army background with a family history of serving the army, Shergill grew up with "Army tales and anecdotes" being a part of dinner table talks to morning walks. Hence, joining the armed forces came "very naturally" to her.

After guiding her contingent on the Army Day as the first Female Adjutant, Shergill felt "great pride, a feeling of accomplishment and worthiness, and pure blessing."

She'd also known while applying for the position of Parade Adjutant on Republic Day that if selected, she would be the "first woman to do that job in history."

Shergill's accomplishments in such a short period of time represent the gradual steps to gender equality that India ever-so-often stumbles upon. The stunning parade of the Republic Day, every year, is a showcase of the might and assets the military possesses.

Watching Shergill lead her contingent with pride and discipline should be a proud moment for each and every Indian.

 

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