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Indians Tell Us One Thing They Will Miss About The Pandemic When It Blows Over

Bingedaily spoke to Indians and they tell us why they don’t hate the pandemic so much.

We certainly won’t miss the phrases we have gotten accustomed to hearing tons of times a day during the pandemic. These include ‘the new normal’, and ‘unprecedented times’, and ‘social distancing is key’ and the most infuriating of all: Stay home. Stay safe.

While these are the need of the hour, people are done hearing these consolations. However, there are certain things we will be missing about the pandemic when it all blows over. Bingedaily spoke to young Indians who tell us why they don’t hate the pandemic so much.

Having Zoom meetings with your dog peeping into the screen

For Mrunalee Kulkarni, the lockdown was nothing short of fun. She’d usually get the puppy dog eyes (literally) and the sad faces when she’d be ready to go out the door every morning. But when the lockdown hit, there was someone who made the most of Mrunalee being home - her doggo!

“We're all definitely going through tough times and are trying to cope with the pandemic one way or the other. I am sort of an introvert and would rather talk to my dog than to humans,” says this canine coach.

Mrunalee Kulkarni

“Pet parents enjoy spending time with their pets and are secretly loving the quarantine period. They’d agree that leaving them behind every morning was like a herculean task! It’s safe to say I am enjoying the work-from-home aspect in this pandemic. Zoom meetings are now fun with your cats and dogs peeping into your laptop screens!”

For Mrunalee the pandemic period was a great opportunity to spend time with her pups, be there for them and balance her passion for pooches and work too. “I’ll definitely miss this once it all is over. I’ll miss my pups.”

Learning about the cosmic world during the pandemic

Sheenu Kala is an art enthusiast and a tarot learner. The pandemic did work in her favour as everyone seemed to want to know how bad things were about to get and rushed to tarot readers. Apart from spending time with her loved ones, Sheenu says the lockdown gave her a breather.

“I began to explore what I wouldn’t have gotten the time to earlier. I began to learn more art forms and delved deeper into tarot reading. The realms of the cosmic world started to attract me and helped me introspect. I started to link happenings, reflect on connections and immerse myself in what seems to be in my control. You’ll be surprised at how destiny and fate are not mere fragments of our imagination.”

Sheenu Kala

“I also started to garden with my mother, flew kites, played games and basically relived my childhood. The pandemic gave me memories to cherish.”

Taking charge of the creative freedom

Nitya Mehrotra, a 20-year-old filmmaker immerses herself in documentaries and animations. As these are works which require an incredible amount of patience and perseverance, Nitya would find herself scrabbling for time.

“The subjects, the illustrations, the specifics, the things these designs reflect, the final conceptualisation do not happen overnight. I haven't ever had this kind of creative freedom and time with my artwork because of other workloads. The pandemic was like a window that helped me escape into this world of my art.”

Taking out time to introspect during the pandemic

For photographers, the pandemic and the lockdown was a damper on spirits. Rajdeep, a photographer uses this art as a way to empower himself and create something that’s aesthetically pleasing.

He can’t seem to pinpoint what he would miss about the pandemic. “There’s nothing to miss about it. My work involves meeting people, jumping into ventures, and all of this came to a complete halt. Travel restrictions were the cherry on the top.”

Rajdeep

“However, if I had to find the light in the dark I’d say the pandemic gave me time to introspect. A space to dig deeper into myself, helping me unearth qualities I am missing as an artist. In the humdrum of every day, it is tough to find these fractions of time where you can sit and reflect. The pandemic gave me more than fractions.”

The pandemic felt like school days all over again

Vaishakhi Mistry, a broker by day and artist by night is so accustomed to working in the 9-5 routine that the pandemic snapping her out of it, was a relief.

“The pandemic was crazy. Let’s admit it. But it was like summer vacation all over again. I thought school would be the last of it, and then this life-changing phase happened. We were forced out of routine and were compelled to go with the flow of life, and the madness around.”

Vaishakhi Mistry

“I'll miss it for sure. The pandemic getting over will leave us with a bitter-sweet feeling. Bitter because the ‘vacation’ is now over, and sweet because it’s time to meet those friends again.”

Getting an opportunity to bond

Arjama Bakshi is a TedX speaker, an artist, the founder of Shareerspeak organisation, an empath and an optimist. “The pandemic was a great time to let art take over and for me to create the masterpieces at ease. Why was this important to me? Through my art, I make an effort to spread awareness about mental health issues, and this took on a deeper meaning during the lockdown. People were looking for a ray of hope.”

Arjama Bakshi

“Work used to make it difficult to spend time with family. But the lockdown changed everything. I bonded with the people I hadn’t gotten time to spend time with. Some bonds just got stronger than ever and when this blows over, I will miss this.”

Getting out of the sedentary lifestyle

Smaran Sardar, a sophomore year Sociology student is a big believer in life revolving around travelling, adventure, dancing, art, acting, fashion, animals and an eco-friendly environment! He says, while at the advent of the pandemic people went through some not-so-beautiful shifts, they soon settled into the new lifestyle.

“We’ve gotten habituated to a sedentary lifestyle. Post-pandemic, we'll miss the late morning coffee, the unlimited time at homes and the long bed sessions. We'll definitely feel short of time.”

Smaran Sardar

“Decreased human activity during the pandemic made the world a better place. That would be undone. We'll miss the wild chirps, the pollution-free air, the everyday complaining about ‘My life has become so boring’”.

“We'll have to cut out much on the relaxation time in our cozy comfortable homes. So yes, there's a mixed bag of emotions around this pandemic getting over.”

Changing the outlook towards life

“I am learning about and exploring the psychic world,” says Snigdha - a banker by profession and a tarot reader by passion. “Using tarot cards and Astro analysis, I help people solve their life problems and get an insight into what’s in store.”

We ask her how a pandemic and its uncertainty works for a tarot reader. Being accustomed to always knowing what lies ahead, it must be a challenge to be in the dark. She says the pandemic certainly made her change her outlook towards life. “It got me to slow down, and the way I saw things took a 360-degree turn.”

Snigdha

“The one thing I’ll crave when the pandemic is over is the time I got to spend with myself. I focused on my chakras, the intricacies of life, meditation and becoming a better version.”

The clock seemed to have stopped ticking this pandemic

Arpita Mohapatra believes that growing up was a challenge as there was always the constant tussle between discovering and rediscovering oneself and justifying societal standards of who we should be. “In the process, most of us end up giving in to the latter. We are always chasing after time, to leave a place and to reach someplace better. The clock seemed to have stopped ticking for me this pandemic. I tried my hands at spill poetry, I read books that were longtime overdue. I found time to explore and broaden my horizons.”

Arpita Mohapatra

“We have always failed to completely understand who we are and what we are capable of unless required,” she says as she points out that the pandemic required us to survive.

“I survived because I created, I discovered, I rediscover and acquired skills.”

Trends

Indians Tell Us One Thing They Will Miss About The Pandemic When It Blows Over

Bingedaily spoke to Indians and they tell us why they don’t hate the pandemic so much.

We certainly won’t miss the phrases we have gotten accustomed to hearing tons of times a day during the pandemic. These include ‘the new normal’, and ‘unprecedented times’, and ‘social distancing is key’ and the most infuriating of all: Stay home. Stay safe.

While these are the need of the hour, people are done hearing these consolations. However, there are certain things we will be missing about the pandemic when it all blows over. Bingedaily spoke to young Indians who tell us why they don’t hate the pandemic so much.

Having Zoom meetings with your dog peeping into the screen

For Mrunalee Kulkarni, the lockdown was nothing short of fun. She’d usually get the puppy dog eyes (literally) and the sad faces when she’d be ready to go out the door every morning. But when the lockdown hit, there was someone who made the most of Mrunalee being home - her doggo!

“We're all definitely going through tough times and are trying to cope with the pandemic one way or the other. I am sort of an introvert and would rather talk to my dog than to humans,” says this canine coach.

Mrunalee Kulkarni

“Pet parents enjoy spending time with their pets and are secretly loving the quarantine period. They’d agree that leaving them behind every morning was like a herculean task! It’s safe to say I am enjoying the work-from-home aspect in this pandemic. Zoom meetings are now fun with your cats and dogs peeping into your laptop screens!”

For Mrunalee the pandemic period was a great opportunity to spend time with her pups, be there for them and balance her passion for pooches and work too. “I’ll definitely miss this once it all is over. I’ll miss my pups.”

Learning about the cosmic world during the pandemic

Sheenu Kala is an art enthusiast and a tarot learner. The pandemic did work in her favour as everyone seemed to want to know how bad things were about to get and rushed to tarot readers. Apart from spending time with her loved ones, Sheenu says the lockdown gave her a breather.

“I began to explore what I wouldn’t have gotten the time to earlier. I began to learn more art forms and delved deeper into tarot reading. The realms of the cosmic world started to attract me and helped me introspect. I started to link happenings, reflect on connections and immerse myself in what seems to be in my control. You’ll be surprised at how destiny and fate are not mere fragments of our imagination.”

Sheenu Kala

“I also started to garden with my mother, flew kites, played games and basically relived my childhood. The pandemic gave me memories to cherish.”

Taking charge of the creative freedom

Nitya Mehrotra, a 20-year-old filmmaker immerses herself in documentaries and animations. As these are works which require an incredible amount of patience and perseverance, Nitya would find herself scrabbling for time.

“The subjects, the illustrations, the specifics, the things these designs reflect, the final conceptualisation do not happen overnight. I haven't ever had this kind of creative freedom and time with my artwork because of other workloads. The pandemic was like a window that helped me escape into this world of my art.”

Taking out time to introspect during the pandemic

For photographers, the pandemic and the lockdown was a damper on spirits. Rajdeep, a photographer uses this art as a way to empower himself and create something that’s aesthetically pleasing.

He can’t seem to pinpoint what he would miss about the pandemic. “There’s nothing to miss about it. My work involves meeting people, jumping into ventures, and all of this came to a complete halt. Travel restrictions were the cherry on the top.”

Rajdeep

“However, if I had to find the light in the dark I’d say the pandemic gave me time to introspect. A space to dig deeper into myself, helping me unearth qualities I am missing as an artist. In the humdrum of every day, it is tough to find these fractions of time where you can sit and reflect. The pandemic gave me more than fractions.”

The pandemic felt like school days all over again

Vaishakhi Mistry, a broker by day and artist by night is so accustomed to working in the 9-5 routine that the pandemic snapping her out of it, was a relief.

“The pandemic was crazy. Let’s admit it. But it was like summer vacation all over again. I thought school would be the last of it, and then this life-changing phase happened. We were forced out of routine and were compelled to go with the flow of life, and the madness around.”

Vaishakhi Mistry

“I'll miss it for sure. The pandemic getting over will leave us with a bitter-sweet feeling. Bitter because the ‘vacation’ is now over, and sweet because it’s time to meet those friends again.”

Getting an opportunity to bond

Arjama Bakshi is a TedX speaker, an artist, the founder of Shareerspeak organisation, an empath and an optimist. “The pandemic was a great time to let art take over and for me to create the masterpieces at ease. Why was this important to me? Through my art, I make an effort to spread awareness about mental health issues, and this took on a deeper meaning during the lockdown. People were looking for a ray of hope.”

Arjama Bakshi

“Work used to make it difficult to spend time with family. But the lockdown changed everything. I bonded with the people I hadn’t gotten time to spend time with. Some bonds just got stronger than ever and when this blows over, I will miss this.”

Getting out of the sedentary lifestyle

Smaran Sardar, a sophomore year Sociology student is a big believer in life revolving around travelling, adventure, dancing, art, acting, fashion, animals and an eco-friendly environment! He says, while at the advent of the pandemic people went through some not-so-beautiful shifts, they soon settled into the new lifestyle.

“We’ve gotten habituated to a sedentary lifestyle. Post-pandemic, we'll miss the late morning coffee, the unlimited time at homes and the long bed sessions. We'll definitely feel short of time.”

Smaran Sardar

“Decreased human activity during the pandemic made the world a better place. That would be undone. We'll miss the wild chirps, the pollution-free air, the everyday complaining about ‘My life has become so boring’”.

“We'll have to cut out much on the relaxation time in our cozy comfortable homes. So yes, there's a mixed bag of emotions around this pandemic getting over.”

Changing the outlook towards life

“I am learning about and exploring the psychic world,” says Snigdha - a banker by profession and a tarot reader by passion. “Using tarot cards and Astro analysis, I help people solve their life problems and get an insight into what’s in store.”

We ask her how a pandemic and its uncertainty works for a tarot reader. Being accustomed to always knowing what lies ahead, it must be a challenge to be in the dark. She says the pandemic certainly made her change her outlook towards life. “It got me to slow down, and the way I saw things took a 360-degree turn.”

Snigdha

“The one thing I’ll crave when the pandemic is over is the time I got to spend with myself. I focused on my chakras, the intricacies of life, meditation and becoming a better version.”

The clock seemed to have stopped ticking this pandemic

Arpita Mohapatra believes that growing up was a challenge as there was always the constant tussle between discovering and rediscovering oneself and justifying societal standards of who we should be. “In the process, most of us end up giving in to the latter. We are always chasing after time, to leave a place and to reach someplace better. The clock seemed to have stopped ticking for me this pandemic. I tried my hands at spill poetry, I read books that were longtime overdue. I found time to explore and broaden my horizons.”

Arpita Mohapatra

“We have always failed to completely understand who we are and what we are capable of unless required,” she says as she points out that the pandemic required us to survive.

“I survived because I created, I discovered, I rediscover and acquired skills.”

Trends

Indians Tell Us One Thing They Will Miss About The Pandemic When It Blows Over

Bingedaily spoke to Indians and they tell us why they don’t hate the pandemic so much.

We certainly won’t miss the phrases we have gotten accustomed to hearing tons of times a day during the pandemic. These include ‘the new normal’, and ‘unprecedented times’, and ‘social distancing is key’ and the most infuriating of all: Stay home. Stay safe.

While these are the need of the hour, people are done hearing these consolations. However, there are certain things we will be missing about the pandemic when it all blows over. Bingedaily spoke to young Indians who tell us why they don’t hate the pandemic so much.

Having Zoom meetings with your dog peeping into the screen

For Mrunalee Kulkarni, the lockdown was nothing short of fun. She’d usually get the puppy dog eyes (literally) and the sad faces when she’d be ready to go out the door every morning. But when the lockdown hit, there was someone who made the most of Mrunalee being home - her doggo!

“We're all definitely going through tough times and are trying to cope with the pandemic one way or the other. I am sort of an introvert and would rather talk to my dog than to humans,” says this canine coach.

Mrunalee Kulkarni

“Pet parents enjoy spending time with their pets and are secretly loving the quarantine period. They’d agree that leaving them behind every morning was like a herculean task! It’s safe to say I am enjoying the work-from-home aspect in this pandemic. Zoom meetings are now fun with your cats and dogs peeping into your laptop screens!”

For Mrunalee the pandemic period was a great opportunity to spend time with her pups, be there for them and balance her passion for pooches and work too. “I’ll definitely miss this once it all is over. I’ll miss my pups.”

Learning about the cosmic world during the pandemic

Sheenu Kala is an art enthusiast and a tarot learner. The pandemic did work in her favour as everyone seemed to want to know how bad things were about to get and rushed to tarot readers. Apart from spending time with her loved ones, Sheenu says the lockdown gave her a breather.

“I began to explore what I wouldn’t have gotten the time to earlier. I began to learn more art forms and delved deeper into tarot reading. The realms of the cosmic world started to attract me and helped me introspect. I started to link happenings, reflect on connections and immerse myself in what seems to be in my control. You’ll be surprised at how destiny and fate are not mere fragments of our imagination.”

Sheenu Kala

“I also started to garden with my mother, flew kites, played games and basically relived my childhood. The pandemic gave me memories to cherish.”

Taking charge of the creative freedom

Nitya Mehrotra, a 20-year-old filmmaker immerses herself in documentaries and animations. As these are works which require an incredible amount of patience and perseverance, Nitya would find herself scrabbling for time.

“The subjects, the illustrations, the specifics, the things these designs reflect, the final conceptualisation do not happen overnight. I haven't ever had this kind of creative freedom and time with my artwork because of other workloads. The pandemic was like a window that helped me escape into this world of my art.”

Taking out time to introspect during the pandemic

For photographers, the pandemic and the lockdown was a damper on spirits. Rajdeep, a photographer uses this art as a way to empower himself and create something that’s aesthetically pleasing.

He can’t seem to pinpoint what he would miss about the pandemic. “There’s nothing to miss about it. My work involves meeting people, jumping into ventures, and all of this came to a complete halt. Travel restrictions were the cherry on the top.”

Rajdeep

“However, if I had to find the light in the dark I’d say the pandemic gave me time to introspect. A space to dig deeper into myself, helping me unearth qualities I am missing as an artist. In the humdrum of every day, it is tough to find these fractions of time where you can sit and reflect. The pandemic gave me more than fractions.”

The pandemic felt like school days all over again

Vaishakhi Mistry, a broker by day and artist by night is so accustomed to working in the 9-5 routine that the pandemic snapping her out of it, was a relief.

“The pandemic was crazy. Let’s admit it. But it was like summer vacation all over again. I thought school would be the last of it, and then this life-changing phase happened. We were forced out of routine and were compelled to go with the flow of life, and the madness around.”

Vaishakhi Mistry

“I'll miss it for sure. The pandemic getting over will leave us with a bitter-sweet feeling. Bitter because the ‘vacation’ is now over, and sweet because it’s time to meet those friends again.”

Getting an opportunity to bond

Arjama Bakshi is a TedX speaker, an artist, the founder of Shareerspeak organisation, an empath and an optimist. “The pandemic was a great time to let art take over and for me to create the masterpieces at ease. Why was this important to me? Through my art, I make an effort to spread awareness about mental health issues, and this took on a deeper meaning during the lockdown. People were looking for a ray of hope.”

Arjama Bakshi

“Work used to make it difficult to spend time with family. But the lockdown changed everything. I bonded with the people I hadn’t gotten time to spend time with. Some bonds just got stronger than ever and when this blows over, I will miss this.”

Getting out of the sedentary lifestyle

Smaran Sardar, a sophomore year Sociology student is a big believer in life revolving around travelling, adventure, dancing, art, acting, fashion, animals and an eco-friendly environment! He says, while at the advent of the pandemic people went through some not-so-beautiful shifts, they soon settled into the new lifestyle.

“We’ve gotten habituated to a sedentary lifestyle. Post-pandemic, we'll miss the late morning coffee, the unlimited time at homes and the long bed sessions. We'll definitely feel short of time.”

Smaran Sardar

“Decreased human activity during the pandemic made the world a better place. That would be undone. We'll miss the wild chirps, the pollution-free air, the everyday complaining about ‘My life has become so boring’”.

“We'll have to cut out much on the relaxation time in our cozy comfortable homes. So yes, there's a mixed bag of emotions around this pandemic getting over.”

Changing the outlook towards life

“I am learning about and exploring the psychic world,” says Snigdha - a banker by profession and a tarot reader by passion. “Using tarot cards and Astro analysis, I help people solve their life problems and get an insight into what’s in store.”

We ask her how a pandemic and its uncertainty works for a tarot reader. Being accustomed to always knowing what lies ahead, it must be a challenge to be in the dark. She says the pandemic certainly made her change her outlook towards life. “It got me to slow down, and the way I saw things took a 360-degree turn.”

Snigdha

“The one thing I’ll crave when the pandemic is over is the time I got to spend with myself. I focused on my chakras, the intricacies of life, meditation and becoming a better version.”

The clock seemed to have stopped ticking this pandemic

Arpita Mohapatra believes that growing up was a challenge as there was always the constant tussle between discovering and rediscovering oneself and justifying societal standards of who we should be. “In the process, most of us end up giving in to the latter. We are always chasing after time, to leave a place and to reach someplace better. The clock seemed to have stopped ticking for me this pandemic. I tried my hands at spill poetry, I read books that were longtime overdue. I found time to explore and broaden my horizons.”

Arpita Mohapatra

“We have always failed to completely understand who we are and what we are capable of unless required,” she says as she points out that the pandemic required us to survive.

“I survived because I created, I discovered, I rediscover and acquired skills.”

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