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Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

A new study explores the possibility of using smartphones to detect marijuana intoxication in consumers. Is it capable of doing so?

Researchers have uncovered preliminary evidence that now smartphones can tell if you’re high on marijuana. It is possible to use smartphone motion sensors to detect whether someone has a cannabis overdose. The method uses information from the owner's smartphone to determine whether or not they are intoxicated after smoking marijuana.

According to the study published by the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, researchers could identify periods of cannabis intoxication among pot users up to a 90% rate of accuracy. This was done by using a combination of time features and data from a smartphone’s GPS, accelerometer, and other sensors.

“This proof-of-concept study indicates the feasibility of using phone sensors to detect subjective cannabis intoxication in the natural environment, with potential implications for triggering just-in-time interventions,” the authors of the study concluded.

What was the study?

The study was based on a survey of 57 individuals residing in Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania. The responses for the study were recorded from young adults aged between 18 and 25, who used marijuana at least twice per week.

The researchers tracked their responses for complete one month. The participants had to self-report the cannabis use at the time of data collection. The data pointers included parameters such as start/stop time and cannabis intoxication rating from 0 to 10. Participants completed 3 surveys per day. They were even asked how high they felt at a given time of day. The team used over 100 features to track whether each participant was high.

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?
Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

Participants also downloaded a smartphone app that analyzed information including GPS data, usage statistics, phone logs, and data from accelerometers and additional activity sensors.

Using this data, researchers were able to determine the importance of time factors which included the time of day and the day of the week to identify periods of cannabis use. They also identified which smartphone sensors proved to be the most useful one in detecting self-reported marijuana intoxication.

Determining Marijuana Intoxication | Outcome

The study was surprisingly able to identify 60% of 451 cannabis usage episodes with extreme accuracy. By using the smartphone sensor data alone, researchers had an accuracy rate of 67%. Apparently, when the smartphone sensor data along with timing features were included in the analysis, the accuracy increased to 90%.

They outlined that intoxication due to cannabis is directly associated with reduced reaction times. Since marijuana can impair psychomotor functioning when users are experiencing that classic “high,” the study showed how technology can help provide real-time intervention for users who may be putting themselves at risk of injury. This intoxication can majorly affect performance at work or college, as well as altered behavior during activities like driving, which can lead to injury or death.

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?
Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

This easy method to detect its intoxication can thus go a long way in helping its consumers prevent overconsumption. This is because the existing screening methods, such as blood, urine, and saliva tests, have limitations as to signs of cannabis intoxication and impairment in daily life. Hence, the study met with satisfactory results.

Another major outcome of the study was that among the whole lot of sensors that phones have are:

  • travel patterns from GPS data
  • movement data from accelerometers

These two sensors were found to be the most crucial for the detection of self-reported cannabis intoxication.

No proper test to detect weed intoxication yet found

The study comes after a long history of unreliable methods of testing for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairments. THC is the main ingredient in marijuana that makes you high.

Currently, there aren’t any tests or equipment to give precise results on marijuana intoxication. Though we have an alcohol breathalyzer test to determine the effect cannabis imposes on the user’s brain.

This is because urine and blood tests can only measure recent drug use. They alone cannot test and detect impairment levels. Until now, areas of performance such as attention, perception, and coordination have been largely subjective.

Another interesting thing to mention is that, so far, research has been hazy in even determining that how much marijuana can actually pose risk to life. Unlike alcohol, how much marijuana is in someone’s blood isn’t directly correlated with how high they are, and consequently, their driving abilities. It all depends on the way you ingest marijuana — by smoking, vaping, or eating. They all have varying effects with the same drug.

There are also factors such as one’s tolerance levels and whether marijuana is being used recreationally or medicinally. This makes it difficult to compare a pot user to the next.

Future research should investigate the performance algorithm of intoxicated vs. non-intoxicated reports, from those who use cannabis less frequently. While experts are still looking for an answer, it will take much more investigation and study before a definitive marijuana intoxication test can be developed and widely used.

Until then, the researchers can use their findings to improve the sensitivity of the app-based tasks. This way people can figure out just how high they are with better accuracy.


Read More!
Is Driving With A Marijuana High Dangerous?

Dope

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

A new study explores the possibility of using smartphones to detect marijuana intoxication in consumers. Is it capable of doing so?

Researchers have uncovered preliminary evidence that now smartphones can tell if you’re high on marijuana. It is possible to use smartphone motion sensors to detect whether someone has a cannabis overdose. The method uses information from the owner's smartphone to determine whether or not they are intoxicated after smoking marijuana.

According to the study published by the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, researchers could identify periods of cannabis intoxication among pot users up to a 90% rate of accuracy. This was done by using a combination of time features and data from a smartphone’s GPS, accelerometer, and other sensors.

“This proof-of-concept study indicates the feasibility of using phone sensors to detect subjective cannabis intoxication in the natural environment, with potential implications for triggering just-in-time interventions,” the authors of the study concluded.

What was the study?

The study was based on a survey of 57 individuals residing in Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania. The responses for the study were recorded from young adults aged between 18 and 25, who used marijuana at least twice per week.

The researchers tracked their responses for complete one month. The participants had to self-report the cannabis use at the time of data collection. The data pointers included parameters such as start/stop time and cannabis intoxication rating from 0 to 10. Participants completed 3 surveys per day. They were even asked how high they felt at a given time of day. The team used over 100 features to track whether each participant was high.

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?
Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

Participants also downloaded a smartphone app that analyzed information including GPS data, usage statistics, phone logs, and data from accelerometers and additional activity sensors.

Using this data, researchers were able to determine the importance of time factors which included the time of day and the day of the week to identify periods of cannabis use. They also identified which smartphone sensors proved to be the most useful one in detecting self-reported marijuana intoxication.

Determining Marijuana Intoxication | Outcome

The study was surprisingly able to identify 60% of 451 cannabis usage episodes with extreme accuracy. By using the smartphone sensor data alone, researchers had an accuracy rate of 67%. Apparently, when the smartphone sensor data along with timing features were included in the analysis, the accuracy increased to 90%.

They outlined that intoxication due to cannabis is directly associated with reduced reaction times. Since marijuana can impair psychomotor functioning when users are experiencing that classic “high,” the study showed how technology can help provide real-time intervention for users who may be putting themselves at risk of injury. This intoxication can majorly affect performance at work or college, as well as altered behavior during activities like driving, which can lead to injury or death.

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?
Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

This easy method to detect its intoxication can thus go a long way in helping its consumers prevent overconsumption. This is because the existing screening methods, such as blood, urine, and saliva tests, have limitations as to signs of cannabis intoxication and impairment in daily life. Hence, the study met with satisfactory results.

Another major outcome of the study was that among the whole lot of sensors that phones have are:

  • travel patterns from GPS data
  • movement data from accelerometers

These two sensors were found to be the most crucial for the detection of self-reported cannabis intoxication.

No proper test to detect weed intoxication yet found

The study comes after a long history of unreliable methods of testing for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairments. THC is the main ingredient in marijuana that makes you high.

Currently, there aren’t any tests or equipment to give precise results on marijuana intoxication. Though we have an alcohol breathalyzer test to determine the effect cannabis imposes on the user’s brain.

This is because urine and blood tests can only measure recent drug use. They alone cannot test and detect impairment levels. Until now, areas of performance such as attention, perception, and coordination have been largely subjective.

Another interesting thing to mention is that, so far, research has been hazy in even determining that how much marijuana can actually pose risk to life. Unlike alcohol, how much marijuana is in someone’s blood isn’t directly correlated with how high they are, and consequently, their driving abilities. It all depends on the way you ingest marijuana — by smoking, vaping, or eating. They all have varying effects with the same drug.

There are also factors such as one’s tolerance levels and whether marijuana is being used recreationally or medicinally. This makes it difficult to compare a pot user to the next.

Future research should investigate the performance algorithm of intoxicated vs. non-intoxicated reports, from those who use cannabis less frequently. While experts are still looking for an answer, it will take much more investigation and study before a definitive marijuana intoxication test can be developed and widely used.

Until then, the researchers can use their findings to improve the sensitivity of the app-based tasks. This way people can figure out just how high they are with better accuracy.


Read More!
Is Driving With A Marijuana High Dangerous?

Dope

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

A new study explores the possibility of using smartphones to detect marijuana intoxication in consumers. Is it capable of doing so?

Researchers have uncovered preliminary evidence that now smartphones can tell if you’re high on marijuana. It is possible to use smartphone motion sensors to detect whether someone has a cannabis overdose. The method uses information from the owner's smartphone to determine whether or not they are intoxicated after smoking marijuana.

According to the study published by the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, researchers could identify periods of cannabis intoxication among pot users up to a 90% rate of accuracy. This was done by using a combination of time features and data from a smartphone’s GPS, accelerometer, and other sensors.

“This proof-of-concept study indicates the feasibility of using phone sensors to detect subjective cannabis intoxication in the natural environment, with potential implications for triggering just-in-time interventions,” the authors of the study concluded.

What was the study?

The study was based on a survey of 57 individuals residing in Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania. The responses for the study were recorded from young adults aged between 18 and 25, who used marijuana at least twice per week.

The researchers tracked their responses for complete one month. The participants had to self-report the cannabis use at the time of data collection. The data pointers included parameters such as start/stop time and cannabis intoxication rating from 0 to 10. Participants completed 3 surveys per day. They were even asked how high they felt at a given time of day. The team used over 100 features to track whether each participant was high.

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?
Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

Participants also downloaded a smartphone app that analyzed information including GPS data, usage statistics, phone logs, and data from accelerometers and additional activity sensors.

Using this data, researchers were able to determine the importance of time factors which included the time of day and the day of the week to identify periods of cannabis use. They also identified which smartphone sensors proved to be the most useful one in detecting self-reported marijuana intoxication.

Determining Marijuana Intoxication | Outcome

The study was surprisingly able to identify 60% of 451 cannabis usage episodes with extreme accuracy. By using the smartphone sensor data alone, researchers had an accuracy rate of 67%. Apparently, when the smartphone sensor data along with timing features were included in the analysis, the accuracy increased to 90%.

They outlined that intoxication due to cannabis is directly associated with reduced reaction times. Since marijuana can impair psychomotor functioning when users are experiencing that classic “high,” the study showed how technology can help provide real-time intervention for users who may be putting themselves at risk of injury. This intoxication can majorly affect performance at work or college, as well as altered behavior during activities like driving, which can lead to injury or death.

Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?
Can your Smartphone Tell If You're High on Marijuana?

This easy method to detect its intoxication can thus go a long way in helping its consumers prevent overconsumption. This is because the existing screening methods, such as blood, urine, and saliva tests, have limitations as to signs of cannabis intoxication and impairment in daily life. Hence, the study met with satisfactory results.

Another major outcome of the study was that among the whole lot of sensors that phones have are:

  • travel patterns from GPS data
  • movement data from accelerometers

These two sensors were found to be the most crucial for the detection of self-reported cannabis intoxication.

No proper test to detect weed intoxication yet found

The study comes after a long history of unreliable methods of testing for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairments. THC is the main ingredient in marijuana that makes you high.

Currently, there aren’t any tests or equipment to give precise results on marijuana intoxication. Though we have an alcohol breathalyzer test to determine the effect cannabis imposes on the user’s brain.

This is because urine and blood tests can only measure recent drug use. They alone cannot test and detect impairment levels. Until now, areas of performance such as attention, perception, and coordination have been largely subjective.

Another interesting thing to mention is that, so far, research has been hazy in even determining that how much marijuana can actually pose risk to life. Unlike alcohol, how much marijuana is in someone’s blood isn’t directly correlated with how high they are, and consequently, their driving abilities. It all depends on the way you ingest marijuana — by smoking, vaping, or eating. They all have varying effects with the same drug.

There are also factors such as one’s tolerance levels and whether marijuana is being used recreationally or medicinally. This makes it difficult to compare a pot user to the next.

Future research should investigate the performance algorithm of intoxicated vs. non-intoxicated reports, from those who use cannabis less frequently. While experts are still looking for an answer, it will take much more investigation and study before a definitive marijuana intoxication test can be developed and widely used.

Until then, the researchers can use their findings to improve the sensitivity of the app-based tasks. This way people can figure out just how high they are with better accuracy.


Read More!
Is Driving With A Marijuana High Dangerous?

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