Trends

Millennials Share Their Opinions On Plastic Surgery

Botched surgeries usually make it into listicles and headlines pretty fast, the risk is high, so why take that risk?

It's been a long, hard debate around plastic surgery, not only from common folk but also from doctors and surgeons. Like any other debate on subjective issues, the debate has come to no conclusion - but hoards of opinions have made their way through.

In light of all these opinions and thoughts, I asked a few millennials what they had in mind about the much-contended issue.

"If someone feels more confident, more beautiful then why debate about it? It's someone's happiness and that's all that should matter, honestly. Live and let live." Aditi, 22 told us.

Many people miss the point entirely when it comes to plastic surgery - the point of the surgery is to help someone feel more confident, to feel more beautiful - why would we contend someone's happiness?

"I think plastic surgery is just the internalization of societal beauty standards, you know? "I want a smaller nose" or "I want to get rid of my fat" or "I want plumper lips" etc is just a culmination of everything society wants from us. And giving in to those standards by engaging in makeup is bad in itself, but getting surgeries to change the way you look is way worse. It's difficult to adhere to society's standard, I know, but giving into them to a point where you're willing to put your body through difficult, superficial, unnecessary changes may not be the best way to deal with it." Juhi, 19 said.

While we see the aspect of happiness, Juhi makes a great point about taking drastic steps to merge into the societal ideas and standards of beauty. Are we subconsciously being driven into modifying the way we look and gain a vicarious sense of happiness?

"When it comes to transition surgeries and sex-change surgeries - I fully support plastic surgery. But, when it comes to simple modifications to look more "beautiful" - like having plumper lips or thinner waists - I'm on the edge. I support people going on the journey to accept themselves and feel happier - but I don't think plastic surgery is the way to do it." Pranav, 21.

Pranav and Juhi seem to be on the same spectrum. Self-acceptance should be organic - or so people say, so how does plastic surgery take place in the idea of self-acceptance? Another great point Pranav makes is that transition surgeries or sex-change surgeries don't fall in the same bracket as cosmetic or other plastic surgeries. Those are entirely different, sort of necessary changes.

"Two words - The Kardashians. I mean none of them to look the same anymore. It's like they're just different people now. Plastic surgeries to that extent are just bizarre - I know it makes them feel better maybe, but I feel uncomfortable seeing such a vast difference. Also, botched surgeries are so common - the risk is unbelievable - but people take the chance, and unfortunately if it doesn't work out, they end up looking like a plastic mess. Why take that risk?" Aditya, 28 said.

Botched surgeries usually make it into listicles and headlines pretty fast, and as Aditya pointed it out correctly - the risk is high, so why take that risk?

It's true that most people edge towards plastic surgery from the societal pressure and beauty standards, but we're all the master of our own choices. Taking the decision to get plastic surgery and going through with it is a difficult task, and support is one of the main factors that help in the process. So, even if you do believe that plastic surgeries are just the internalization of beauty standards or simply a bad choice, keep that opinion to yourself and support a friend that may decide to do it.

Trends

Millennials Share Their Opinions On Plastic Surgery

Botched surgeries usually make it into listicles and headlines pretty fast, the risk is high, so why take that risk?

It's been a long, hard debate around plastic surgery, not only from common folk but also from doctors and surgeons. Like any other debate on subjective issues, the debate has come to no conclusion - but hoards of opinions have made their way through.

In light of all these opinions and thoughts, I asked a few millennials what they had in mind about the much-contended issue.

"If someone feels more confident, more beautiful then why debate about it? It's someone's happiness and that's all that should matter, honestly. Live and let live." Aditi, 22 told us.

Many people miss the point entirely when it comes to plastic surgery - the point of the surgery is to help someone feel more confident, to feel more beautiful - why would we contend someone's happiness?

"I think plastic surgery is just the internalization of societal beauty standards, you know? "I want a smaller nose" or "I want to get rid of my fat" or "I want plumper lips" etc is just a culmination of everything society wants from us. And giving in to those standards by engaging in makeup is bad in itself, but getting surgeries to change the way you look is way worse. It's difficult to adhere to society's standard, I know, but giving into them to a point where you're willing to put your body through difficult, superficial, unnecessary changes may not be the best way to deal with it." Juhi, 19 said.

While we see the aspect of happiness, Juhi makes a great point about taking drastic steps to merge into the societal ideas and standards of beauty. Are we subconsciously being driven into modifying the way we look and gain a vicarious sense of happiness?

"When it comes to transition surgeries and sex-change surgeries - I fully support plastic surgery. But, when it comes to simple modifications to look more "beautiful" - like having plumper lips or thinner waists - I'm on the edge. I support people going on the journey to accept themselves and feel happier - but I don't think plastic surgery is the way to do it." Pranav, 21.

Pranav and Juhi seem to be on the same spectrum. Self-acceptance should be organic - or so people say, so how does plastic surgery take place in the idea of self-acceptance? Another great point Pranav makes is that transition surgeries or sex-change surgeries don't fall in the same bracket as cosmetic or other plastic surgeries. Those are entirely different, sort of necessary changes.

"Two words - The Kardashians. I mean none of them to look the same anymore. It's like they're just different people now. Plastic surgeries to that extent are just bizarre - I know it makes them feel better maybe, but I feel uncomfortable seeing such a vast difference. Also, botched surgeries are so common - the risk is unbelievable - but people take the chance, and unfortunately if it doesn't work out, they end up looking like a plastic mess. Why take that risk?" Aditya, 28 said.

Botched surgeries usually make it into listicles and headlines pretty fast, and as Aditya pointed it out correctly - the risk is high, so why take that risk?

It's true that most people edge towards plastic surgery from the societal pressure and beauty standards, but we're all the master of our own choices. Taking the decision to get plastic surgery and going through with it is a difficult task, and support is one of the main factors that help in the process. So, even if you do believe that plastic surgeries are just the internalization of beauty standards or simply a bad choice, keep that opinion to yourself and support a friend that may decide to do it.

Trends

Millennials Share Their Opinions On Plastic Surgery

Botched surgeries usually make it into listicles and headlines pretty fast, the risk is high, so why take that risk?

It's been a long, hard debate around plastic surgery, not only from common folk but also from doctors and surgeons. Like any other debate on subjective issues, the debate has come to no conclusion - but hoards of opinions have made their way through.

In light of all these opinions and thoughts, I asked a few millennials what they had in mind about the much-contended issue.

"If someone feels more confident, more beautiful then why debate about it? It's someone's happiness and that's all that should matter, honestly. Live and let live." Aditi, 22 told us.

Many people miss the point entirely when it comes to plastic surgery - the point of the surgery is to help someone feel more confident, to feel more beautiful - why would we contend someone's happiness?

"I think plastic surgery is just the internalization of societal beauty standards, you know? "I want a smaller nose" or "I want to get rid of my fat" or "I want plumper lips" etc is just a culmination of everything society wants from us. And giving in to those standards by engaging in makeup is bad in itself, but getting surgeries to change the way you look is way worse. It's difficult to adhere to society's standard, I know, but giving into them to a point where you're willing to put your body through difficult, superficial, unnecessary changes may not be the best way to deal with it." Juhi, 19 said.

While we see the aspect of happiness, Juhi makes a great point about taking drastic steps to merge into the societal ideas and standards of beauty. Are we subconsciously being driven into modifying the way we look and gain a vicarious sense of happiness?

"When it comes to transition surgeries and sex-change surgeries - I fully support plastic surgery. But, when it comes to simple modifications to look more "beautiful" - like having plumper lips or thinner waists - I'm on the edge. I support people going on the journey to accept themselves and feel happier - but I don't think plastic surgery is the way to do it." Pranav, 21.

Pranav and Juhi seem to be on the same spectrum. Self-acceptance should be organic - or so people say, so how does plastic surgery take place in the idea of self-acceptance? Another great point Pranav makes is that transition surgeries or sex-change surgeries don't fall in the same bracket as cosmetic or other plastic surgeries. Those are entirely different, sort of necessary changes.

"Two words - The Kardashians. I mean none of them to look the same anymore. It's like they're just different people now. Plastic surgeries to that extent are just bizarre - I know it makes them feel better maybe, but I feel uncomfortable seeing such a vast difference. Also, botched surgeries are so common - the risk is unbelievable - but people take the chance, and unfortunately if it doesn't work out, they end up looking like a plastic mess. Why take that risk?" Aditya, 28 said.

Botched surgeries usually make it into listicles and headlines pretty fast, and as Aditya pointed it out correctly - the risk is high, so why take that risk?

It's true that most people edge towards plastic surgery from the societal pressure and beauty standards, but we're all the master of our own choices. Taking the decision to get plastic surgery and going through with it is a difficult task, and support is one of the main factors that help in the process. So, even if you do believe that plastic surgeries are just the internalization of beauty standards or simply a bad choice, keep that opinion to yourself and support a friend that may decide to do it.

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Ti-Amo Gelato In Pune!

This place also has a wide selection of food items on it's menu.