Dope

Sonic drugs: Can you really get high on music?

I'm pretty sure everyone who listens to music has had an experience where a particular track has made them space out.

I'm pretty sure everyone who listens to music has had an experience where a particular track has made them space out. Music has the power to make you travel to another dimension even when you are completely sober. And as drugs get more expensive and harder to procure, the trend of I-dosing is making a comeback.

In the late 2000s, people realised that my mixing and listening to sounds of certain frequencies for a certain period of time can replicate the effects of drugs. People started experimenting with different kinds of sounds to the extent that they developed sounds that replicate the effects of different drugs such as marijuana, Ketamine, Heroin and cocaine. 

All of these 'digital drugs' are available online and it's mostly teenagers exploring the interwebs who end up listening to these tracks. There are thousands of videos on youtube of teenagers getting high on Sonic drugs and talking about how cool the experience was.

So I decided to give it a shot and came across a youtube video that said that it would replicate the effects of Marijuana. I put my earphones, shut my eyes and played the video. I was wrong to expect a song in the video. Instead, it was just random noises that were synchronised. But in a matter of seconds, I started feeling light-headed. I felt as if everything had slowed down and I was on some sort of an astral plane! I had goosebumps and the paranoia started to set in. after listening to the sounds for around 6 minutes, I took them off only to get dizzy and lose my sense of orientation and perception of depth!

I knew why the teenagers thought tripping on sounds was cool. But its also really bad in a way. A research conducted in the United States by NBC4 showed how kids were amused by tripping on music were persuaded to try real drugs just to see what effect it would have on them. And the conversion rate of people who switched from Sonic drugs to real drugs was too damn high!

NBC also had one of their TV reporters undergo a brain scan while listening to one of these tracks. Her scans revealed that the music had a major effect on her brain activity. She felt euphoria and her hands felt tingly. 

The scary reality of these Sonic drugs is that they are available on the internet for free and anyone who has a cell phone or a computer can possibly get high. But I would not recommend trying this at all, mostly because I got paranoid. I would rather suggest listening to an episode of Armin Van Buuren's A State Of Trance or a mix of Tiesto's pre-2005 trance hits. These mixes always give me a sense of euphoria and make me space out but in a good way! Also, I would rather listen to actual trance music than random noises that make me paranoid!

Dope

Sonic drugs: Can you really get high on music?

I'm pretty sure everyone who listens to music has had an experience where a particular track has made them space out.

I'm pretty sure everyone who listens to music has had an experience where a particular track has made them space out. Music has the power to make you travel to another dimension even when you are completely sober. And as drugs get more expensive and harder to procure, the trend of I-dosing is making a comeback.

In the late 2000s, people realised that my mixing and listening to sounds of certain frequencies for a certain period of time can replicate the effects of drugs. People started experimenting with different kinds of sounds to the extent that they developed sounds that replicate the effects of different drugs such as marijuana, Ketamine, Heroin and cocaine. 

All of these 'digital drugs' are available online and it's mostly teenagers exploring the interwebs who end up listening to these tracks. There are thousands of videos on youtube of teenagers getting high on Sonic drugs and talking about how cool the experience was.

So I decided to give it a shot and came across a youtube video that said that it would replicate the effects of Marijuana. I put my earphones, shut my eyes and played the video. I was wrong to expect a song in the video. Instead, it was just random noises that were synchronised. But in a matter of seconds, I started feeling light-headed. I felt as if everything had slowed down and I was on some sort of an astral plane! I had goosebumps and the paranoia started to set in. after listening to the sounds for around 6 minutes, I took them off only to get dizzy and lose my sense of orientation and perception of depth!

I knew why the teenagers thought tripping on sounds was cool. But its also really bad in a way. A research conducted in the United States by NBC4 showed how kids were amused by tripping on music were persuaded to try real drugs just to see what effect it would have on them. And the conversion rate of people who switched from Sonic drugs to real drugs was too damn high!

NBC also had one of their TV reporters undergo a brain scan while listening to one of these tracks. Her scans revealed that the music had a major effect on her brain activity. She felt euphoria and her hands felt tingly. 

The scary reality of these Sonic drugs is that they are available on the internet for free and anyone who has a cell phone or a computer can possibly get high. But I would not recommend trying this at all, mostly because I got paranoid. I would rather suggest listening to an episode of Armin Van Buuren's A State Of Trance or a mix of Tiesto's pre-2005 trance hits. These mixes always give me a sense of euphoria and make me space out but in a good way! Also, I would rather listen to actual trance music than random noises that make me paranoid!

Dope

Sonic drugs: Can you really get high on music?

I'm pretty sure everyone who listens to music has had an experience where a particular track has made them space out.

I'm pretty sure everyone who listens to music has had an experience where a particular track has made them space out. Music has the power to make you travel to another dimension even when you are completely sober. And as drugs get more expensive and harder to procure, the trend of I-dosing is making a comeback.

In the late 2000s, people realised that my mixing and listening to sounds of certain frequencies for a certain period of time can replicate the effects of drugs. People started experimenting with different kinds of sounds to the extent that they developed sounds that replicate the effects of different drugs such as marijuana, Ketamine, Heroin and cocaine. 

All of these 'digital drugs' are available online and it's mostly teenagers exploring the interwebs who end up listening to these tracks. There are thousands of videos on youtube of teenagers getting high on Sonic drugs and talking about how cool the experience was.

So I decided to give it a shot and came across a youtube video that said that it would replicate the effects of Marijuana. I put my earphones, shut my eyes and played the video. I was wrong to expect a song in the video. Instead, it was just random noises that were synchronised. But in a matter of seconds, I started feeling light-headed. I felt as if everything had slowed down and I was on some sort of an astral plane! I had goosebumps and the paranoia started to set in. after listening to the sounds for around 6 minutes, I took them off only to get dizzy and lose my sense of orientation and perception of depth!

I knew why the teenagers thought tripping on sounds was cool. But its also really bad in a way. A research conducted in the United States by NBC4 showed how kids were amused by tripping on music were persuaded to try real drugs just to see what effect it would have on them. And the conversion rate of people who switched from Sonic drugs to real drugs was too damn high!

NBC also had one of their TV reporters undergo a brain scan while listening to one of these tracks. Her scans revealed that the music had a major effect on her brain activity. She felt euphoria and her hands felt tingly. 

The scary reality of these Sonic drugs is that they are available on the internet for free and anyone who has a cell phone or a computer can possibly get high. But I would not recommend trying this at all, mostly because I got paranoid. I would rather suggest listening to an episode of Armin Van Buuren's A State Of Trance or a mix of Tiesto's pre-2005 trance hits. These mixes always give me a sense of euphoria and make me space out but in a good way! Also, I would rather listen to actual trance music than random noises that make me paranoid!

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Good News : Week 03

Start 2020 on a bright note with your weekly dose of Good News!