Culture

The Art of Fingering Fruit

Stephanie Sarley makes multimedia art that makes you uncomfortable at first glance, completely grab your attention, and ignites sexual energy.

When you read the word food porn, the image that immediately pops up to your head is probably an Instagramable dish that will make your mouth water in just a couple of glances. The food porn we’re talking about right now, though, is an actual combination of food, and porn. Stephanie Sarley makes multimedia art that makes you uncomfortable at first glance, completely grab your attention, and ignites sexual energy.


Stephanie’s page, which has been shut down by Instagram thrice in the past and currently has 371k followers, is famous for her fruit-fingering sensual videos. She has even made a lemon squirt once, right into the camera! You’re lying if you say that her videos don’t make you feel anything. The manner may be unique, but her work has provoked more than a conversation about sexual oppression in our society. 
Right from making peaches squirt and fingering lemons, to shaving bananas and jerking off cucumbers, the sexual energy in her work cannot be denied. Stephanie has been quoted as saying that she was partly inspired by the fact that the imagery of the vulva, throughout history, has been frowned on, and censored. 
Although she works with mangoes, bananas, strawberries, avocados, and even bread, a quick glance through her page will show you that her most preferred fruit of choice seems to be citrus. This is because of its similarity to the real thing. It physically represents what she is trying to portray, and also easily squirts! The idea for the experimental art came to Stephanie when she was playing around with an orange her boyfriend gave her. She has, on different occasions, spoken about the videos personifying and empowering vaginas through humor, absurdity, and the acceptance of female sexuality at large. 
I have been following her work for a few years now and yet, I cannot look at the fruits in her videos as just fruits. I think that itself is an achievement for the artist. To take an everyday object that has no sexual meaning to it and transform it, with your art and imagination to the extent that it makes you think of sexual acts, is truly remarkable. We say we’re progressive and sex isn’t considered a taboo anymore but are still conditioned to be uncomfortable talking about the vagina. Artwork like this plays a huge role in reconditioning this mindset.
 My colleague’s first reaction when I showed him the video was to cringe and turn the phone away but soon, he too was scrolling through her profile, checking the other videos. It’s not aesthetic or appealing, he told me, shrugging. But when was the purpose of art, ever, to be appealing, Instragramable or even pretty? Art is supposed to make you feel things, and I think Stephanie very literally, has put a finger on how to do that, don’t you agree?

Culture

The Art of Fingering Fruit

Stephanie Sarley makes multimedia art that makes you uncomfortable at first glance, completely grab your attention, and ignites sexual energy.

When you read the word food porn, the image that immediately pops up to your head is probably an Instagramable dish that will make your mouth water in just a couple of glances. The food porn we’re talking about right now, though, is an actual combination of food, and porn. Stephanie Sarley makes multimedia art that makes you uncomfortable at first glance, completely grab your attention, and ignites sexual energy.


Stephanie’s page, which has been shut down by Instagram thrice in the past and currently has 371k followers, is famous for her fruit-fingering sensual videos. She has even made a lemon squirt once, right into the camera! You’re lying if you say that her videos don’t make you feel anything. The manner may be unique, but her work has provoked more than a conversation about sexual oppression in our society. 
Right from making peaches squirt and fingering lemons, to shaving bananas and jerking off cucumbers, the sexual energy in her work cannot be denied. Stephanie has been quoted as saying that she was partly inspired by the fact that the imagery of the vulva, throughout history, has been frowned on, and censored. 
Although she works with mangoes, bananas, strawberries, avocados, and even bread, a quick glance through her page will show you that her most preferred fruit of choice seems to be citrus. This is because of its similarity to the real thing. It physically represents what she is trying to portray, and also easily squirts! The idea for the experimental art came to Stephanie when she was playing around with an orange her boyfriend gave her. She has, on different occasions, spoken about the videos personifying and empowering vaginas through humor, absurdity, and the acceptance of female sexuality at large. 
I have been following her work for a few years now and yet, I cannot look at the fruits in her videos as just fruits. I think that itself is an achievement for the artist. To take an everyday object that has no sexual meaning to it and transform it, with your art and imagination to the extent that it makes you think of sexual acts, is truly remarkable. We say we’re progressive and sex isn’t considered a taboo anymore but are still conditioned to be uncomfortable talking about the vagina. Artwork like this plays a huge role in reconditioning this mindset.
 My colleague’s first reaction when I showed him the video was to cringe and turn the phone away but soon, he too was scrolling through her profile, checking the other videos. It’s not aesthetic or appealing, he told me, shrugging. But when was the purpose of art, ever, to be appealing, Instragramable or even pretty? Art is supposed to make you feel things, and I think Stephanie very literally, has put a finger on how to do that, don’t you agree?

Culture

The Art of Fingering Fruit

Stephanie Sarley makes multimedia art that makes you uncomfortable at first glance, completely grab your attention, and ignites sexual energy.

When you read the word food porn, the image that immediately pops up to your head is probably an Instagramable dish that will make your mouth water in just a couple of glances. The food porn we’re talking about right now, though, is an actual combination of food, and porn. Stephanie Sarley makes multimedia art that makes you uncomfortable at first glance, completely grab your attention, and ignites sexual energy.


Stephanie’s page, which has been shut down by Instagram thrice in the past and currently has 371k followers, is famous for her fruit-fingering sensual videos. She has even made a lemon squirt once, right into the camera! You’re lying if you say that her videos don’t make you feel anything. The manner may be unique, but her work has provoked more than a conversation about sexual oppression in our society. 
Right from making peaches squirt and fingering lemons, to shaving bananas and jerking off cucumbers, the sexual energy in her work cannot be denied. Stephanie has been quoted as saying that she was partly inspired by the fact that the imagery of the vulva, throughout history, has been frowned on, and censored. 
Although she works with mangoes, bananas, strawberries, avocados, and even bread, a quick glance through her page will show you that her most preferred fruit of choice seems to be citrus. This is because of its similarity to the real thing. It physically represents what she is trying to portray, and also easily squirts! The idea for the experimental art came to Stephanie when she was playing around with an orange her boyfriend gave her. She has, on different occasions, spoken about the videos personifying and empowering vaginas through humor, absurdity, and the acceptance of female sexuality at large. 
I have been following her work for a few years now and yet, I cannot look at the fruits in her videos as just fruits. I think that itself is an achievement for the artist. To take an everyday object that has no sexual meaning to it and transform it, with your art and imagination to the extent that it makes you think of sexual acts, is truly remarkable. We say we’re progressive and sex isn’t considered a taboo anymore but are still conditioned to be uncomfortable talking about the vagina. Artwork like this plays a huge role in reconditioning this mindset.
 My colleague’s first reaction when I showed him the video was to cringe and turn the phone away but soon, he too was scrolling through her profile, checking the other videos. It’s not aesthetic or appealing, he told me, shrugging. But when was the purpose of art, ever, to be appealing, Instragramable or even pretty? Art is supposed to make you feel things, and I think Stephanie very literally, has put a finger on how to do that, don’t you agree?

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