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Culture

The Big Fat Indian Wedding #MillennialsSpeak

The Big Fat Indian Wedding is a tradition that has been going on for generations. But do the Millennials feel the same about it?

The Indian wedding industry is a billion-dollar one. 50 billion dollars to be precise, and it's only going to grow from there. Half of India's 1.3 billion-strong population is under the age of 30 and with incomes growing, the market for weddings is only going to boom. 

When it comes to India, the big fat Indian wedding has always been a fixture. Lavish destination weddings, picturesque locations, countless ceremonies and a never-ending guest list. If there's an Indian wedding, more often than not, it is grander than you'd ever imagine. 

However, that trend is slowly but surely changing. The big fat Indian wedding may have run its course. Trends show a preference for compact weddings with smaller guest lists, fewer rituals, and lower expenses. While you may not believe that, seeing the over the top wedding photoshoots posted across social media and the growing affinity for designer clothes, a study conducted by Deccan Chronicle actually proves the argument. According to it, buying a home, saving to retire early, travelling the world al rank higher in terms of priority as compared to having an opulent wedding. But do the results of the study match the ground reality? Are Millennials really moving away from opulent weddings? Let's find out.

"I've not thought about marriage as such, but I certainly favour the big traditional Indian wedding. We've grown up watching the full celebration in movies and have even attended them since forever. I'd want the same festivities if I decide to get married"
--- Priyal, 20

"I have 10, okay maybe 20 good friends. Even if we count family members, I don't think I would want more than 50 people at my wedding. I'd rather have a close-knit affair than this huge celebration where I don't even know 80% of the people."

--- Jai, 21

"Hopefully, I'll be marrying only once. I would want it to be something that is remembered for a lifetime, so I think I'd like to have a wedding which is so crazy that I and my friends even talk about it years down the line. I'd like to fund it on my own though. I think that's only fair, considering it's me who wants it to be grand and crazy"
--- Nikhil, 23

"I've seen my relatives and people I know spend their entire savings on their weddings. While I get the fact that it's their money and if that's what they want, so be it. But I can't help think of the fact that the entire exercise is just so vain. There are so many people you don't know, you spend so much on décor and dresses that are only going to be used for that one day, and you really can spend all that money on yourself which I feel would be just more rewarding."
---Kritika, 20

"I don't know I can't take a call right now. Like I get the argument that if you look at it pragmatically, it's just a big waste of money. You can even have a nice, intimate wedding with a low budget. But you can't deny the fact that when you see all those celebrity wedding pictures, those lavish decorations and the over the top celebrations, there's a part of you that feels nice about it. So maybe I'd want to share that moment with my special someone too when the time comes. Let's see"

--- Jhanvi, 20

Culture

The Big Fat Indian Wedding #MillennialsSpeak

The Big Fat Indian Wedding is a tradition that has been going on for generations. But do the Millennials feel the same about it?

The Indian wedding industry is a billion-dollar one. 50 billion dollars to be precise, and it's only going to grow from there. Half of India's 1.3 billion-strong population is under the age of 30 and with incomes growing, the market for weddings is only going to boom. 

When it comes to India, the big fat Indian wedding has always been a fixture. Lavish destination weddings, picturesque locations, countless ceremonies and a never-ending guest list. If there's an Indian wedding, more often than not, it is grander than you'd ever imagine. 

However, that trend is slowly but surely changing. The big fat Indian wedding may have run its course. Trends show a preference for compact weddings with smaller guest lists, fewer rituals, and lower expenses. While you may not believe that, seeing the over the top wedding photoshoots posted across social media and the growing affinity for designer clothes, a study conducted by Deccan Chronicle actually proves the argument. According to it, buying a home, saving to retire early, travelling the world al rank higher in terms of priority as compared to having an opulent wedding. But do the results of the study match the ground reality? Are Millennials really moving away from opulent weddings? Let's find out.

"I've not thought about marriage as such, but I certainly favour the big traditional Indian wedding. We've grown up watching the full celebration in movies and have even attended them since forever. I'd want the same festivities if I decide to get married"
--- Priyal, 20

"I have 10, okay maybe 20 good friends. Even if we count family members, I don't think I would want more than 50 people at my wedding. I'd rather have a close-knit affair than this huge celebration where I don't even know 80% of the people."

--- Jai, 21

"Hopefully, I'll be marrying only once. I would want it to be something that is remembered for a lifetime, so I think I'd like to have a wedding which is so crazy that I and my friends even talk about it years down the line. I'd like to fund it on my own though. I think that's only fair, considering it's me who wants it to be grand and crazy"
--- Nikhil, 23

"I've seen my relatives and people I know spend their entire savings on their weddings. While I get the fact that it's their money and if that's what they want, so be it. But I can't help think of the fact that the entire exercise is just so vain. There are so many people you don't know, you spend so much on décor and dresses that are only going to be used for that one day, and you really can spend all that money on yourself which I feel would be just more rewarding."
---Kritika, 20

"I don't know I can't take a call right now. Like I get the argument that if you look at it pragmatically, it's just a big waste of money. You can even have a nice, intimate wedding with a low budget. But you can't deny the fact that when you see all those celebrity wedding pictures, those lavish decorations and the over the top celebrations, there's a part of you that feels nice about it. So maybe I'd want to share that moment with my special someone too when the time comes. Let's see"

--- Jhanvi, 20

Culture

The Big Fat Indian Wedding #MillennialsSpeak

The Big Fat Indian Wedding is a tradition that has been going on for generations. But do the Millennials feel the same about it?

The Indian wedding industry is a billion-dollar one. 50 billion dollars to be precise, and it's only going to grow from there. Half of India's 1.3 billion-strong population is under the age of 30 and with incomes growing, the market for weddings is only going to boom. 

When it comes to India, the big fat Indian wedding has always been a fixture. Lavish destination weddings, picturesque locations, countless ceremonies and a never-ending guest list. If there's an Indian wedding, more often than not, it is grander than you'd ever imagine. 

However, that trend is slowly but surely changing. The big fat Indian wedding may have run its course. Trends show a preference for compact weddings with smaller guest lists, fewer rituals, and lower expenses. While you may not believe that, seeing the over the top wedding photoshoots posted across social media and the growing affinity for designer clothes, a study conducted by Deccan Chronicle actually proves the argument. According to it, buying a home, saving to retire early, travelling the world al rank higher in terms of priority as compared to having an opulent wedding. But do the results of the study match the ground reality? Are Millennials really moving away from opulent weddings? Let's find out.

"I've not thought about marriage as such, but I certainly favour the big traditional Indian wedding. We've grown up watching the full celebration in movies and have even attended them since forever. I'd want the same festivities if I decide to get married"
--- Priyal, 20

"I have 10, okay maybe 20 good friends. Even if we count family members, I don't think I would want more than 50 people at my wedding. I'd rather have a close-knit affair than this huge celebration where I don't even know 80% of the people."

--- Jai, 21

"Hopefully, I'll be marrying only once. I would want it to be something that is remembered for a lifetime, so I think I'd like to have a wedding which is so crazy that I and my friends even talk about it years down the line. I'd like to fund it on my own though. I think that's only fair, considering it's me who wants it to be grand and crazy"
--- Nikhil, 23

"I've seen my relatives and people I know spend their entire savings on their weddings. While I get the fact that it's their money and if that's what they want, so be it. But I can't help think of the fact that the entire exercise is just so vain. There are so many people you don't know, you spend so much on décor and dresses that are only going to be used for that one day, and you really can spend all that money on yourself which I feel would be just more rewarding."
---Kritika, 20

"I don't know I can't take a call right now. Like I get the argument that if you look at it pragmatically, it's just a big waste of money. You can even have a nice, intimate wedding with a low budget. But you can't deny the fact that when you see all those celebrity wedding pictures, those lavish decorations and the over the top celebrations, there's a part of you that feels nice about it. So maybe I'd want to share that moment with my special someone too when the time comes. Let's see"

--- Jhanvi, 20