Trends

The State of Kashmir #MillennialsSpeak

In order to find out what they feel, We decided to talk to some Millennials hailing from Kashmir. Here's what they had to say about the state of their home.

It’s been a full week since Kashmir went under military siege. 7 days of little to no communication, perpetual curfew and a whole lot of uncertainty about what the future holds for the region. Reports on what the area is going through have been anything but consistent. From a BBC coverage showing the army opening fire on the people to an official statement by the J&K Police stating that they haven’t fired as much as a bullet in the past week.

There has been no shortage of attention given to the region though. More than 45,000 troops are currently present in the region, with National Security Advisor Ajit Doval also visiting Kashmir to gauge the situation and interact with the locals. Social media and news channels have been laden with opinions and debates on the issue, with everyone having a say on whether the move was right or not.

Looking from the outside, having an opinion on whether the removal of Article 370 was a right one or not can be a tricky business. Most of us haven’t ever been to the region, nor do we know all the facts and the ground reality to truly make a proper opinion. If you want a factual take on what the Articles meant for the region click here for our take on the issue. So keeping this in mind, we decided to talk to some Millennials hailing from the region, who’re now residing in different parts of the country, to understand what they feel about the state of the region they call their home right now.

 

Opinion

“I don’t believe it was the right way to do it. Being a law student I have actually studied the legal aspect of it and would like to consider myself as well informed. The fact that it was done so quickly, and in a way which practically held the people hostage and locked in their own homes, just goes to show that even if this had to be done eventually, it certainly could have been done in better manner”

---Shaanvi,22, Law Student

“I would not like to comment on this right now. I don’t agree with it and that is in no way an indicator of my political opinion. I’d rather wait and watch than just go bonkers online with stories and posts. But my parents are really happy with it. And I guess they are in a much better position than me to speak on this. They were the ones who had to leave their homes in Kashmir overnight all those years back, not me.”

---Richa, 20, Student

“I was supposed to go back home for a wedding this month. Now that’s cancelled. It’s Eid on Monday and there’s no way it’ll be the same with all that is going on around there. Well, we don’t even know what’s really going on because there’s no way to contact the people I know. Tell me if all this sounds right to you?”

---Rashid, 19 , Aspiring Cricketer

“This was a long time coming. I don’t get the hue and cry over it. Changing your display pictures, uploading statuses and all of that is just a fad right now. When the Kashmiri Pandits were thrown away, when Kashmir crumbled with militancy and terrorism, no one thought of the situation then. Tough times call for tough measures. That’s the way I see it.”

--- Shweta, 21, Student

“It’s actually a good thing you know. It’ll help in integrating the region, make it more accountable. For so long, it’s just been left hanging because of the whole legality around it. This move will allow the Indian government to pay full attention to it, at the same time equipping it with the legal authority to carry out developmental activities. It’ll seem like a great thing a few years down the line!”

--- Aaryyan, 21 , Student

Conclusion

It’s easy to understand where the differing opinions come from. Kashmir is in fact, regarded as the world’s most militarized zone as well as the largest region occupied by security forces. It has seen a lot of bloodsheds, militancy and tough periods since Independence. However, the thought of a fresh start, under the leadership of a government which does not shy away from doing what it sets out to do has given hope to a lot of people regarding the future of the state. Such a history is bound to polarize opinion and so we can see. Whether the decision was right or wrong? Only time will tell.was right or wrong? Only time will tell.

Trends

The State of Kashmir #MillennialsSpeak

In order to find out what they feel, We decided to talk to some Millennials hailing from Kashmir. Here's what they had to say about the state of their home.

It’s been a full week since Kashmir went under military siege. 7 days of little to no communication, perpetual curfew and a whole lot of uncertainty about what the future holds for the region. Reports on what the area is going through have been anything but consistent. From a BBC coverage showing the army opening fire on the people to an official statement by the J&K Police stating that they haven’t fired as much as a bullet in the past week.

There has been no shortage of attention given to the region though. More than 45,000 troops are currently present in the region, with National Security Advisor Ajit Doval also visiting Kashmir to gauge the situation and interact with the locals. Social media and news channels have been laden with opinions and debates on the issue, with everyone having a say on whether the move was right or not.

Looking from the outside, having an opinion on whether the removal of Article 370 was a right one or not can be a tricky business. Most of us haven’t ever been to the region, nor do we know all the facts and the ground reality to truly make a proper opinion. If you want a factual take on what the Articles meant for the region click here for our take on the issue. So keeping this in mind, we decided to talk to some Millennials hailing from the region, who’re now residing in different parts of the country, to understand what they feel about the state of the region they call their home right now.

 

Opinion

“I don’t believe it was the right way to do it. Being a law student I have actually studied the legal aspect of it and would like to consider myself as well informed. The fact that it was done so quickly, and in a way which practically held the people hostage and locked in their own homes, just goes to show that even if this had to be done eventually, it certainly could have been done in better manner”

---Shaanvi,22, Law Student

“I would not like to comment on this right now. I don’t agree with it and that is in no way an indicator of my political opinion. I’d rather wait and watch than just go bonkers online with stories and posts. But my parents are really happy with it. And I guess they are in a much better position than me to speak on this. They were the ones who had to leave their homes in Kashmir overnight all those years back, not me.”

---Richa, 20, Student

“I was supposed to go back home for a wedding this month. Now that’s cancelled. It’s Eid on Monday and there’s no way it’ll be the same with all that is going on around there. Well, we don’t even know what’s really going on because there’s no way to contact the people I know. Tell me if all this sounds right to you?”

---Rashid, 19 , Aspiring Cricketer

“This was a long time coming. I don’t get the hue and cry over it. Changing your display pictures, uploading statuses and all of that is just a fad right now. When the Kashmiri Pandits were thrown away, when Kashmir crumbled with militancy and terrorism, no one thought of the situation then. Tough times call for tough measures. That’s the way I see it.”

--- Shweta, 21, Student

“It’s actually a good thing you know. It’ll help in integrating the region, make it more accountable. For so long, it’s just been left hanging because of the whole legality around it. This move will allow the Indian government to pay full attention to it, at the same time equipping it with the legal authority to carry out developmental activities. It’ll seem like a great thing a few years down the line!”

--- Aaryyan, 21 , Student

Conclusion

It’s easy to understand where the differing opinions come from. Kashmir is in fact, regarded as the world’s most militarized zone as well as the largest region occupied by security forces. It has seen a lot of bloodsheds, militancy and tough periods since Independence. However, the thought of a fresh start, under the leadership of a government which does not shy away from doing what it sets out to do has given hope to a lot of people regarding the future of the state. Such a history is bound to polarize opinion and so we can see. Whether the decision was right or wrong? Only time will tell.was right or wrong? Only time will tell.

Trends

The State of Kashmir #MillennialsSpeak

In order to find out what they feel, We decided to talk to some Millennials hailing from Kashmir. Here's what they had to say about the state of their home.

It’s been a full week since Kashmir went under military siege. 7 days of little to no communication, perpetual curfew and a whole lot of uncertainty about what the future holds for the region. Reports on what the area is going through have been anything but consistent. From a BBC coverage showing the army opening fire on the people to an official statement by the J&K Police stating that they haven’t fired as much as a bullet in the past week.

There has been no shortage of attention given to the region though. More than 45,000 troops are currently present in the region, with National Security Advisor Ajit Doval also visiting Kashmir to gauge the situation and interact with the locals. Social media and news channels have been laden with opinions and debates on the issue, with everyone having a say on whether the move was right or not.

Looking from the outside, having an opinion on whether the removal of Article 370 was a right one or not can be a tricky business. Most of us haven’t ever been to the region, nor do we know all the facts and the ground reality to truly make a proper opinion. If you want a factual take on what the Articles meant for the region click here for our take on the issue. So keeping this in mind, we decided to talk to some Millennials hailing from the region, who’re now residing in different parts of the country, to understand what they feel about the state of the region they call their home right now.

 

Opinion

“I don’t believe it was the right way to do it. Being a law student I have actually studied the legal aspect of it and would like to consider myself as well informed. The fact that it was done so quickly, and in a way which practically held the people hostage and locked in their own homes, just goes to show that even if this had to be done eventually, it certainly could have been done in better manner”

---Shaanvi,22, Law Student

“I would not like to comment on this right now. I don’t agree with it and that is in no way an indicator of my political opinion. I’d rather wait and watch than just go bonkers online with stories and posts. But my parents are really happy with it. And I guess they are in a much better position than me to speak on this. They were the ones who had to leave their homes in Kashmir overnight all those years back, not me.”

---Richa, 20, Student

“I was supposed to go back home for a wedding this month. Now that’s cancelled. It’s Eid on Monday and there’s no way it’ll be the same with all that is going on around there. Well, we don’t even know what’s really going on because there’s no way to contact the people I know. Tell me if all this sounds right to you?”

---Rashid, 19 , Aspiring Cricketer

“This was a long time coming. I don’t get the hue and cry over it. Changing your display pictures, uploading statuses and all of that is just a fad right now. When the Kashmiri Pandits were thrown away, when Kashmir crumbled with militancy and terrorism, no one thought of the situation then. Tough times call for tough measures. That’s the way I see it.”

--- Shweta, 21, Student

“It’s actually a good thing you know. It’ll help in integrating the region, make it more accountable. For so long, it’s just been left hanging because of the whole legality around it. This move will allow the Indian government to pay full attention to it, at the same time equipping it with the legal authority to carry out developmental activities. It’ll seem like a great thing a few years down the line!”

--- Aaryyan, 21 , Student

Conclusion

It’s easy to understand where the differing opinions come from. Kashmir is in fact, regarded as the world’s most militarized zone as well as the largest region occupied by security forces. It has seen a lot of bloodsheds, militancy and tough periods since Independence. However, the thought of a fresh start, under the leadership of a government which does not shy away from doing what it sets out to do has given hope to a lot of people regarding the future of the state. Such a history is bound to polarize opinion and so we can see. Whether the decision was right or wrong? Only time will tell.was right or wrong? Only time will tell.

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Eats

Juicy Meaty Burgers At Burger House!

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