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Health

Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

Magnesium and sleep. When to take Magnesium for sleep. Magnesium makes sleep cycle better? Other health benefits and how Magnesium can be consumed safely.

We are all aware that sleep is extremely important for mental and physical health. We're also aware that sometimes sleeping is not always the easiest thing for some people to do. However, that implies that if you aren't sleeping well, you should first consult your doctor. A variety of health concerns, including sleep apnea, dementia, and even mental illnesses, could be to blame. However, there are situations when nothing solid is causing the problem, and gaining more rest can be as simple as changing your lifestyle patterns. This could entail taking melatonin or trying CBD, but there's another option you may not be aware of- Magnesium.

Magnesium, a mineral found in nuts, seafood, and dark leafy greens, helps cells maintain the circadian rhythm that humans have used for generations to control sleep, wake time, hormones, and body temperature, according to a University of Edinburgh study released Wednesday.

What is Magnesium?

Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!
Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

Magnesium is required for a variety of biological activities. Getting enough of this mineral can aid in the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and migraine headaches.

It's critical to get adequate magnesium for a variety of reasons. To begin with, magnesium is required for your body to produce sufficient energy. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is important for bone growth and also helps with vital biological functions including heart rhythm and muscle contractions.

leafy green vegetables like spinach and nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains, are good sources of magnesium.

Magnesium is required for a variety of biological activities. Getting enough of this mineral can aid in the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and migraine headaches.

How can not having enough magnesium hamper your sleep cycle?

Sleep disturbances and even insomnia can be caused by a lack of magnesium in the body.

According to mouse studies, appropriate quantities of this mineral are required for good sleep, and both excessive and low amounts might induce sleep issues.

Magnesium shortage is more common in certain categories of various types of people, including:

People with digestive problems:

Digestive problems might cause your body to absorb vitamins and minerals incorrectly, resulting in shortages.

People with diabetes:

Excess magnesium loss is connected to insulin resistance and diabetes.

People who are addicted to alcohol:

Those who consume a lot of alcohol are more likely to be deficient in this mineral.

Elderly persons:

Many older persons consume less magnesium in their diets than younger individuals, and they may also absorb it less efficiently.

Why it matters?

What's at stake: Knowing how magnesium affects your circadian rhythm has major implications for chronotherapy, a type of depression treatment based on the body's natural cycles.

What's good about this discovery is that if your sleep is disrupted and you want to regain control of your circadian rhythm, eating more magnesium-rich foods may be able to assist you in doing so. Fortunately, some of the most delicious meals include high levels of magnesium, including dark chocolate, avocados, bananas, and a variety of other foods.

Magnesium: Can it help you sleep better? And Other Health Benefits
Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

It Can Help Your Body and Brain Relax

Your body and brain must relax to fall asleep and stay asleep. Magnesium helps this process by stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system, which is in charge of making you feel calm and relaxed ).

Magnesium, for starters, modulates neurotransmitters, which carry messages throughout the nervous system and brain. It also controls the hormone melatonin, which leads your body's sleep-wake cycles. Magnesium may aid in the preparation of your body and mind for sleep by calming the nervous system.

It Helps Regulate Sleep Quality

Magnesium aids in sleep initiation and aids in the attainment of deep and restful sleep. In one experiment, elderly people were given either 500 mg of magnesium or a placebo. In general, the magnesium group had superior sleep quality.

Renin and melatonin, two hormones that help regulate sleep, were also greater in this group. Another trial that offered senior persons with insomnia a supplement comprising 225 mg magnesium, 5 mg melatonin, and 11.25 mg zinc backed up these findings.

This second study's participants also slept better than the placebo group, however, it's difficult to attribute the benefit to magnesium because the supplement also contained zinc and melatonin. Another study discovered that causing a magnesium shortage in mice led to light and restless sleep patterns. This is due in part to the mineral's effects on the nervous system. It inhibits the binding of more excitable chemicals to neurons, resulting in a calmer nervous system.

However, because the present study only looked at magnesium supplements for insomnia in older adults, it's unclear whether younger people would benefit as well.

How to take magnesium safely?

If you think magnesium might help you sleep better, increasing your magnesium intake through your diet is a simple method to do so. The National Institutes of Health recommends that all women between the ages of 19 and 30 have 310 mg of magnesium each day. From the age of 31, daily consumption of 320 milligrams is advised.

However, taking too much magnesium might be dangerous: "Magnesium in high concentrations can raise magnesium levels in the blood, that can affect the heart," warns Dr. Barone. To be clear, prescribing magnesium for better sleep isn't always recommended. Daniel Barone, MD, sleep expert at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, and author of Let's Talk about Sleep: A Guide to Understanding and Improving Your Slumber, tells Health that "a lot of this stuff is kind of peripheral in terms of hardcore science."

“That being said, the theory is magnesium works by calming down the central nervous system,” Dr. Barone explains.

Taking a magnesium supplement each night before bed won't necessarily harm you—as long as you've talked to a sleep specialist about it and aren't self-medicating with magnesium supplements needlessly. However, if you're still having difficulties sleeping after seeing a sleep specialist and getting a comprehensive workup, it can't hurt to try magnesium.

Magnesium-rich foods

Examine your food first if you want to increase your magnesium intake. According to Harvard Medical School, most people acquire adequate magnesium via a healthy diet rich in magnesium-rich foods. Furthermore, some processed foods deplete nutrients, resulting in a significant reduction in magnesium concentration. For the finest source of dietary magnesium, we recommend consuming complete, unprocessed foods.

Another excellent source of dietary magnesium is water—aqua guard, bottled, or mineral. However, not all water is equal, as the quantity of magnesium in it varies depending on the brand and area.

Almonds, spinach (boiled), cashews, peanuts, and shredded wheat cereal are the foods highest in magnesium, listed in descending order.

Other magnesium-rich foods are:

  • Dark leafy greens
  • Seeds and nuts, especially cashews, almonds, sunflower, and sesame seeds
  • Squash, broccoli
  • Peanut butter
  • Legumes
  • Soymilk
  • Dairy
  • Avocado
  • Bananas
  • Salmon, halibut
  • Beef, chicken breast

Risks of too much magnesium

The body will clear any excess magnesium from meals through urine, therefore an overdose of magnesium from food is uncommon. On the other hand, supplementing with magnesium might cause gastrointestinal issues like diarrhea, nausea, and cramps.

Extremely high doses can result in kidney difficulties, low blood pressure, urine retention, nausea and vomiting, depression, lethargy, loss of central nervous system (CNS) control, cardiac arrest, and death. Magnesium supplements should not be taken by those who have kidney disease unless their doctor recommends it.

Health

Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

Magnesium and sleep. When to take Magnesium for sleep. Magnesium makes sleep cycle better? Other health benefits and how Magnesium can be consumed safely.

We are all aware that sleep is extremely important for mental and physical health. We're also aware that sometimes sleeping is not always the easiest thing for some people to do. However, that implies that if you aren't sleeping well, you should first consult your doctor. A variety of health concerns, including sleep apnea, dementia, and even mental illnesses, could be to blame. However, there are situations when nothing solid is causing the problem, and gaining more rest can be as simple as changing your lifestyle patterns. This could entail taking melatonin or trying CBD, but there's another option you may not be aware of- Magnesium.

Magnesium, a mineral found in nuts, seafood, and dark leafy greens, helps cells maintain the circadian rhythm that humans have used for generations to control sleep, wake time, hormones, and body temperature, according to a University of Edinburgh study released Wednesday.

What is Magnesium?

Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!
Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

Magnesium is required for a variety of biological activities. Getting enough of this mineral can aid in the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and migraine headaches.

It's critical to get adequate magnesium for a variety of reasons. To begin with, magnesium is required for your body to produce sufficient energy. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is important for bone growth and also helps with vital biological functions including heart rhythm and muscle contractions.

leafy green vegetables like spinach and nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains, are good sources of magnesium.

Magnesium is required for a variety of biological activities. Getting enough of this mineral can aid in the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and migraine headaches.

How can not having enough magnesium hamper your sleep cycle?

Sleep disturbances and even insomnia can be caused by a lack of magnesium in the body.

According to mouse studies, appropriate quantities of this mineral are required for good sleep, and both excessive and low amounts might induce sleep issues.

Magnesium shortage is more common in certain categories of various types of people, including:

People with digestive problems:

Digestive problems might cause your body to absorb vitamins and minerals incorrectly, resulting in shortages.

People with diabetes:

Excess magnesium loss is connected to insulin resistance and diabetes.

People who are addicted to alcohol:

Those who consume a lot of alcohol are more likely to be deficient in this mineral.

Elderly persons:

Many older persons consume less magnesium in their diets than younger individuals, and they may also absorb it less efficiently.

Why it matters?

What's at stake: Knowing how magnesium affects your circadian rhythm has major implications for chronotherapy, a type of depression treatment based on the body's natural cycles.

What's good about this discovery is that if your sleep is disrupted and you want to regain control of your circadian rhythm, eating more magnesium-rich foods may be able to assist you in doing so. Fortunately, some of the most delicious meals include high levels of magnesium, including dark chocolate, avocados, bananas, and a variety of other foods.

Magnesium: Can it help you sleep better? And Other Health Benefits
Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

It Can Help Your Body and Brain Relax

Your body and brain must relax to fall asleep and stay asleep. Magnesium helps this process by stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system, which is in charge of making you feel calm and relaxed ).

Magnesium, for starters, modulates neurotransmitters, which carry messages throughout the nervous system and brain. It also controls the hormone melatonin, which leads your body's sleep-wake cycles. Magnesium may aid in the preparation of your body and mind for sleep by calming the nervous system.

It Helps Regulate Sleep Quality

Magnesium aids in sleep initiation and aids in the attainment of deep and restful sleep. In one experiment, elderly people were given either 500 mg of magnesium or a placebo. In general, the magnesium group had superior sleep quality.

Renin and melatonin, two hormones that help regulate sleep, were also greater in this group. Another trial that offered senior persons with insomnia a supplement comprising 225 mg magnesium, 5 mg melatonin, and 11.25 mg zinc backed up these findings.

This second study's participants also slept better than the placebo group, however, it's difficult to attribute the benefit to magnesium because the supplement also contained zinc and melatonin. Another study discovered that causing a magnesium shortage in mice led to light and restless sleep patterns. This is due in part to the mineral's effects on the nervous system. It inhibits the binding of more excitable chemicals to neurons, resulting in a calmer nervous system.

However, because the present study only looked at magnesium supplements for insomnia in older adults, it's unclear whether younger people would benefit as well.

How to take magnesium safely?

If you think magnesium might help you sleep better, increasing your magnesium intake through your diet is a simple method to do so. The National Institutes of Health recommends that all women between the ages of 19 and 30 have 310 mg of magnesium each day. From the age of 31, daily consumption of 320 milligrams is advised.

However, taking too much magnesium might be dangerous: "Magnesium in high concentrations can raise magnesium levels in the blood, that can affect the heart," warns Dr. Barone. To be clear, prescribing magnesium for better sleep isn't always recommended. Daniel Barone, MD, sleep expert at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, and author of Let's Talk about Sleep: A Guide to Understanding and Improving Your Slumber, tells Health that "a lot of this stuff is kind of peripheral in terms of hardcore science."

“That being said, the theory is magnesium works by calming down the central nervous system,” Dr. Barone explains.

Taking a magnesium supplement each night before bed won't necessarily harm you—as long as you've talked to a sleep specialist about it and aren't self-medicating with magnesium supplements needlessly. However, if you're still having difficulties sleeping after seeing a sleep specialist and getting a comprehensive workup, it can't hurt to try magnesium.

Magnesium-rich foods

Examine your food first if you want to increase your magnesium intake. According to Harvard Medical School, most people acquire adequate magnesium via a healthy diet rich in magnesium-rich foods. Furthermore, some processed foods deplete nutrients, resulting in a significant reduction in magnesium concentration. For the finest source of dietary magnesium, we recommend consuming complete, unprocessed foods.

Another excellent source of dietary magnesium is water—aqua guard, bottled, or mineral. However, not all water is equal, as the quantity of magnesium in it varies depending on the brand and area.

Almonds, spinach (boiled), cashews, peanuts, and shredded wheat cereal are the foods highest in magnesium, listed in descending order.

Other magnesium-rich foods are:

  • Dark leafy greens
  • Seeds and nuts, especially cashews, almonds, sunflower, and sesame seeds
  • Squash, broccoli
  • Peanut butter
  • Legumes
  • Soymilk
  • Dairy
  • Avocado
  • Bananas
  • Salmon, halibut
  • Beef, chicken breast

Risks of too much magnesium

The body will clear any excess magnesium from meals through urine, therefore an overdose of magnesium from food is uncommon. On the other hand, supplementing with magnesium might cause gastrointestinal issues like diarrhea, nausea, and cramps.

Extremely high doses can result in kidney difficulties, low blood pressure, urine retention, nausea and vomiting, depression, lethargy, loss of central nervous system (CNS) control, cardiac arrest, and death. Magnesium supplements should not be taken by those who have kidney disease unless their doctor recommends it.

Health

Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

Magnesium and sleep. When to take Magnesium for sleep. Magnesium makes sleep cycle better? Other health benefits and how Magnesium can be consumed safely.

We are all aware that sleep is extremely important for mental and physical health. We're also aware that sometimes sleeping is not always the easiest thing for some people to do. However, that implies that if you aren't sleeping well, you should first consult your doctor. A variety of health concerns, including sleep apnea, dementia, and even mental illnesses, could be to blame. However, there are situations when nothing solid is causing the problem, and gaining more rest can be as simple as changing your lifestyle patterns. This could entail taking melatonin or trying CBD, but there's another option you may not be aware of- Magnesium.

Magnesium, a mineral found in nuts, seafood, and dark leafy greens, helps cells maintain the circadian rhythm that humans have used for generations to control sleep, wake time, hormones, and body temperature, according to a University of Edinburgh study released Wednesday.

What is Magnesium?

Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!
Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

Magnesium is required for a variety of biological activities. Getting enough of this mineral can aid in the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and migraine headaches.

It's critical to get adequate magnesium for a variety of reasons. To begin with, magnesium is required for your body to produce sufficient energy. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is important for bone growth and also helps with vital biological functions including heart rhythm and muscle contractions.

leafy green vegetables like spinach and nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains, are good sources of magnesium.

Magnesium is required for a variety of biological activities. Getting enough of this mineral can aid in the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and migraine headaches.

How can not having enough magnesium hamper your sleep cycle?

Sleep disturbances and even insomnia can be caused by a lack of magnesium in the body.

According to mouse studies, appropriate quantities of this mineral are required for good sleep, and both excessive and low amounts might induce sleep issues.

Magnesium shortage is more common in certain categories of various types of people, including:

People with digestive problems:

Digestive problems might cause your body to absorb vitamins and minerals incorrectly, resulting in shortages.

People with diabetes:

Excess magnesium loss is connected to insulin resistance and diabetes.

People who are addicted to alcohol:

Those who consume a lot of alcohol are more likely to be deficient in this mineral.

Elderly persons:

Many older persons consume less magnesium in their diets than younger individuals, and they may also absorb it less efficiently.

Why it matters?

What's at stake: Knowing how magnesium affects your circadian rhythm has major implications for chronotherapy, a type of depression treatment based on the body's natural cycles.

What's good about this discovery is that if your sleep is disrupted and you want to regain control of your circadian rhythm, eating more magnesium-rich foods may be able to assist you in doing so. Fortunately, some of the most delicious meals include high levels of magnesium, including dark chocolate, avocados, bananas, and a variety of other foods.

Magnesium: Can it help you sleep better? And Other Health Benefits
Wanna Fix Your Sleep? Magnesium In Diet Might Be The Answer!

It Can Help Your Body and Brain Relax

Your body and brain must relax to fall asleep and stay asleep. Magnesium helps this process by stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system, which is in charge of making you feel calm and relaxed ).

Magnesium, for starters, modulates neurotransmitters, which carry messages throughout the nervous system and brain. It also controls the hormone melatonin, which leads your body's sleep-wake cycles. Magnesium may aid in the preparation of your body and mind for sleep by calming the nervous system.

It Helps Regulate Sleep Quality

Magnesium aids in sleep initiation and aids in the attainment of deep and restful sleep. In one experiment, elderly people were given either 500 mg of magnesium or a placebo. In general, the magnesium group had superior sleep quality.

Renin and melatonin, two hormones that help regulate sleep, were also greater in this group. Another trial that offered senior persons with insomnia a supplement comprising 225 mg magnesium, 5 mg melatonin, and 11.25 mg zinc backed up these findings.

This second study's participants also slept better than the placebo group, however, it's difficult to attribute the benefit to magnesium because the supplement also contained zinc and melatonin. Another study discovered that causing a magnesium shortage in mice led to light and restless sleep patterns. This is due in part to the mineral's effects on the nervous system. It inhibits the binding of more excitable chemicals to neurons, resulting in a calmer nervous system.

However, because the present study only looked at magnesium supplements for insomnia in older adults, it's unclear whether younger people would benefit as well.

How to take magnesium safely?

If you think magnesium might help you sleep better, increasing your magnesium intake through your diet is a simple method to do so. The National Institutes of Health recommends that all women between the ages of 19 and 30 have 310 mg of magnesium each day. From the age of 31, daily consumption of 320 milligrams is advised.

However, taking too much magnesium might be dangerous: "Magnesium in high concentrations can raise magnesium levels in the blood, that can affect the heart," warns Dr. Barone. To be clear, prescribing magnesium for better sleep isn't always recommended. Daniel Barone, MD, sleep expert at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, and author of Let's Talk about Sleep: A Guide to Understanding and Improving Your Slumber, tells Health that "a lot of this stuff is kind of peripheral in terms of hardcore science."

“That being said, the theory is magnesium works by calming down the central nervous system,” Dr. Barone explains.

Taking a magnesium supplement each night before bed won't necessarily harm you—as long as you've talked to a sleep specialist about it and aren't self-medicating with magnesium supplements needlessly. However, if you're still having difficulties sleeping after seeing a sleep specialist and getting a comprehensive workup, it can't hurt to try magnesium.

Magnesium-rich foods

Examine your food first if you want to increase your magnesium intake. According to Harvard Medical School, most people acquire adequate magnesium via a healthy diet rich in magnesium-rich foods. Furthermore, some processed foods deplete nutrients, resulting in a significant reduction in magnesium concentration. For the finest source of dietary magnesium, we recommend consuming complete, unprocessed foods.

Another excellent source of dietary magnesium is water—aqua guard, bottled, or mineral. However, not all water is equal, as the quantity of magnesium in it varies depending on the brand and area.

Almonds, spinach (boiled), cashews, peanuts, and shredded wheat cereal are the foods highest in magnesium, listed in descending order.

Other magnesium-rich foods are:

  • Dark leafy greens
  • Seeds and nuts, especially cashews, almonds, sunflower, and sesame seeds
  • Squash, broccoli
  • Peanut butter
  • Legumes
  • Soymilk
  • Dairy
  • Avocado
  • Bananas
  • Salmon, halibut
  • Beef, chicken breast

Risks of too much magnesium

The body will clear any excess magnesium from meals through urine, therefore an overdose of magnesium from food is uncommon. On the other hand, supplementing with magnesium might cause gastrointestinal issues like diarrhea, nausea, and cramps.

Extremely high doses can result in kidney difficulties, low blood pressure, urine retention, nausea and vomiting, depression, lethargy, loss of central nervous system (CNS) control, cardiac arrest, and death. Magnesium supplements should not be taken by those who have kidney disease unless their doctor recommends it.

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