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Entertainment

Your Next Concert Will Be Very Different To Your Last One

The way concerts are held is bound to be affected by the coronavirus. In the post pandemic world, here's how concerts may look like.

Anything that involved people getting together is bound to change in the post COVID world. The world as you know it has changed, and so have your beloved concerts.

Recently a video of a people in Dublin performing a dance routine while practising social distancing made the waves online.

Several music concerts are also getting back to hosting live shows. The way they’re held gives an insight into how live concerts will look like from now on.

Concerts As We Knew Have Changed

On May 15, Travis McCready of blues-rock band Bishop Gunn threw what was known as “America’s First Pandemic Concert” in Fort Smith, Arkansas. While the fact that we are already moving into an era where live concerts are back on, the way they’ve held shows how much the world of live performances has changed.

The venue, Temple live, filled only 229 out of its 1,100 seats, to ensure social distancing between concert goers. Seats were assigned in groups of two to 13 seats and were blocked off from other groups of people to ensure safe distance. Not only this, as has become the norm, wearing masks was compulsory.

Temperature checks and hand sanitizer stations were at every entry point, and a cap of 10 people was placed on public restrooms. Before the concert started, a company disinfect rooms and public areas with fog sprayers before the show.

Considering the apprehensions of people visiting large places filled with people, we could also see artists trying out different forms of live entertainment. Keith Urban recently held a special drive-in show for healthcare workers. To ensure a safe distance between people, all of them watched and listened to the performance from their cars,

What Concerts May Look Like Under New Safety Guidelines

With concerts being permitted to open in the US in some states, The Event Safety Alliance has published safety guidelines. The guidebook lists out the best steps to undertake at venues. It includes the many safety precautions we have now become accustomed to, just customized to suit the environment you would encounter in concerts. Some of the suggestions include:-

Virtual Queuing For Entry Lines

Event organizers have been asked to consider a way to ensure staggered entry of concert-goers. This may mean allotting times to particular groups to prevent overcrowding. Another suggestion involves different entry points for checking in, security and ticket scanning to make sure adequate distance is maintained.

Online Tickets

In a bid to reduce physical contact, the use of Paper tickets and cash may be minimized as much as possible. This involves making online tickets available in advance and doing away with the concept of a physical box office for ticket collection

Sanitizer Stations

Once a patron has presented their ticket and entered the venue, there should be hand sanitizer or options for handwashing immediately in front of them. This could be a common sight in the concerts in the post-pandemic world

Packed Concerts Are A Thing Of The Past

All the things you loved about the concert are now a no. Standing at the front, crowd surfing and even moshing is in violation of social distancing. To make sure people are at a 6 feet distance, you may see the ground marked with tape or chalk to mark the distance.

Food And Beverage

Online menus have been touted as a suggestion to avoid multiple people touching the same menu. The way you’re served may change as well. One suggestion involved notifying people by text when they’re order is ready, following which they can pick up their food from a designated pick-up area, creating a touchless service experience

While these are just the starters, there are several other ways live concerts will change in the post-pandemic world. As and when new concerts start taking place, they’ll give us an insight into what concerts will look like now. But one thing is for sure. The next time you attend a concert will be entirely different from your last one.

Entertainment

Your Next Concert Will Be Very Different To Your Last One

The way concerts are held is bound to be affected by the coronavirus. In the post pandemic world, here's how concerts may look like.

Anything that involved people getting together is bound to change in the post COVID world. The world as you know it has changed, and so have your beloved concerts.

Recently a video of a people in Dublin performing a dance routine while practising social distancing made the waves online.

Several music concerts are also getting back to hosting live shows. The way they’re held gives an insight into how live concerts will look like from now on.

Concerts As We Knew Have Changed

On May 15, Travis McCready of blues-rock band Bishop Gunn threw what was known as “America’s First Pandemic Concert” in Fort Smith, Arkansas. While the fact that we are already moving into an era where live concerts are back on, the way they’ve held shows how much the world of live performances has changed.

The venue, Temple live, filled only 229 out of its 1,100 seats, to ensure social distancing between concert goers. Seats were assigned in groups of two to 13 seats and were blocked off from other groups of people to ensure safe distance. Not only this, as has become the norm, wearing masks was compulsory.

Temperature checks and hand sanitizer stations were at every entry point, and a cap of 10 people was placed on public restrooms. Before the concert started, a company disinfect rooms and public areas with fog sprayers before the show.

Considering the apprehensions of people visiting large places filled with people, we could also see artists trying out different forms of live entertainment. Keith Urban recently held a special drive-in show for healthcare workers. To ensure a safe distance between people, all of them watched and listened to the performance from their cars,

What Concerts May Look Like Under New Safety Guidelines

With concerts being permitted to open in the US in some states, The Event Safety Alliance has published safety guidelines. The guidebook lists out the best steps to undertake at venues. It includes the many safety precautions we have now become accustomed to, just customized to suit the environment you would encounter in concerts. Some of the suggestions include:-

Virtual Queuing For Entry Lines

Event organizers have been asked to consider a way to ensure staggered entry of concert-goers. This may mean allotting times to particular groups to prevent overcrowding. Another suggestion involves different entry points for checking in, security and ticket scanning to make sure adequate distance is maintained.

Online Tickets

In a bid to reduce physical contact, the use of Paper tickets and cash may be minimized as much as possible. This involves making online tickets available in advance and doing away with the concept of a physical box office for ticket collection

Sanitizer Stations

Once a patron has presented their ticket and entered the venue, there should be hand sanitizer or options for handwashing immediately in front of them. This could be a common sight in the concerts in the post-pandemic world

Packed Concerts Are A Thing Of The Past

All the things you loved about the concert are now a no. Standing at the front, crowd surfing and even moshing is in violation of social distancing. To make sure people are at a 6 feet distance, you may see the ground marked with tape or chalk to mark the distance.

Food And Beverage

Online menus have been touted as a suggestion to avoid multiple people touching the same menu. The way you’re served may change as well. One suggestion involved notifying people by text when they’re order is ready, following which they can pick up their food from a designated pick-up area, creating a touchless service experience

While these are just the starters, there are several other ways live concerts will change in the post-pandemic world. As and when new concerts start taking place, they’ll give us an insight into what concerts will look like now. But one thing is for sure. The next time you attend a concert will be entirely different from your last one.

Entertainment

Your Next Concert Will Be Very Different To Your Last One

The way concerts are held is bound to be affected by the coronavirus. In the post pandemic world, here's how concerts may look like.

Anything that involved people getting together is bound to change in the post COVID world. The world as you know it has changed, and so have your beloved concerts.

Recently a video of a people in Dublin performing a dance routine while practising social distancing made the waves online.

Several music concerts are also getting back to hosting live shows. The way they’re held gives an insight into how live concerts will look like from now on.

Concerts As We Knew Have Changed

On May 15, Travis McCready of blues-rock band Bishop Gunn threw what was known as “America’s First Pandemic Concert” in Fort Smith, Arkansas. While the fact that we are already moving into an era where live concerts are back on, the way they’ve held shows how much the world of live performances has changed.

The venue, Temple live, filled only 229 out of its 1,100 seats, to ensure social distancing between concert goers. Seats were assigned in groups of two to 13 seats and were blocked off from other groups of people to ensure safe distance. Not only this, as has become the norm, wearing masks was compulsory.

Temperature checks and hand sanitizer stations were at every entry point, and a cap of 10 people was placed on public restrooms. Before the concert started, a company disinfect rooms and public areas with fog sprayers before the show.

Considering the apprehensions of people visiting large places filled with people, we could also see artists trying out different forms of live entertainment. Keith Urban recently held a special drive-in show for healthcare workers. To ensure a safe distance between people, all of them watched and listened to the performance from their cars,

What Concerts May Look Like Under New Safety Guidelines

With concerts being permitted to open in the US in some states, The Event Safety Alliance has published safety guidelines. The guidebook lists out the best steps to undertake at venues. It includes the many safety precautions we have now become accustomed to, just customized to suit the environment you would encounter in concerts. Some of the suggestions include:-

Virtual Queuing For Entry Lines

Event organizers have been asked to consider a way to ensure staggered entry of concert-goers. This may mean allotting times to particular groups to prevent overcrowding. Another suggestion involves different entry points for checking in, security and ticket scanning to make sure adequate distance is maintained.

Online Tickets

In a bid to reduce physical contact, the use of Paper tickets and cash may be minimized as much as possible. This involves making online tickets available in advance and doing away with the concept of a physical box office for ticket collection

Sanitizer Stations

Once a patron has presented their ticket and entered the venue, there should be hand sanitizer or options for handwashing immediately in front of them. This could be a common sight in the concerts in the post-pandemic world

Packed Concerts Are A Thing Of The Past

All the things you loved about the concert are now a no. Standing at the front, crowd surfing and even moshing is in violation of social distancing. To make sure people are at a 6 feet distance, you may see the ground marked with tape or chalk to mark the distance.

Food And Beverage

Online menus have been touted as a suggestion to avoid multiple people touching the same menu. The way you’re served may change as well. One suggestion involved notifying people by text when they’re order is ready, following which they can pick up their food from a designated pick-up area, creating a touchless service experience

While these are just the starters, there are several other ways live concerts will change in the post-pandemic world. As and when new concerts start taking place, they’ll give us an insight into what concerts will look like now. But one thing is for sure. The next time you attend a concert will be entirely different from your last one.

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